Archive for the ‘Nashville’ Category

‘Tanya Tucker: Strong Enough to Bend’ at Nashville’s Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum

November 19, 2014
The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum in Nashville explores the career of superstar Tanya Tucker with the exhibition Tanya Tucker: Strong Enough to Bend, running through May 2015.

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum in Nashville explores the career of superstar Tanya Tucker with the exhibition Tanya Tucker: Strong Enough to Bend, running through May 2015.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum explores the career of superstar Tanya Tucker with the exhibition Tanya Tucker: Strong Enough to Bend, running through May 2015.

Tucker’s story is told through a collection of artifacts that illustrate her tough and tender duality and ahead-of-her-time tenure as a female country crossover star. Gorgeous stage costumes, including several Nudie’s Rodeo Tailor designs from very early in her career and gowns worn at award shows contrast with her numerous National Cutting Horse Association awards and a Harley-Davidson 1992 Screamin’ Eagle— customized in her special hue of pink paint. A copy of the September 26, 1974 Rolling Stone magazine featuring Tucker as the first female country artist to appear on the cover underscores her impact, as do Tucker’s outfit from the 1994 Super Bowl halftime show and a script from her 1981 appearance on an episode of the massively popular TV series The Love Boat.

Tanya Tucker’s talent blossomed early, despite being born into poverty in Texas and raised in ramshackle apartments and trailers in Arizona, Utah, and Nevada. She began performing on local shows at age six, and within years was a regular on a Phoenix TV program.  A Las Vegas agent sent a demo recording to Billy Sherrill, who quickly signed Tucker to Columbia Records. She was thirteen years old.

At the time, few child performers had achieved success in country music. But the singer’s husky voice and audacious confidence made her seem more grown-up. She proved as much when she walked into a Nashville studio, in March 1972, and announced to Sherrill and the veteran musicians, “Well, I know my part, boys. Do you know yours?” She proceeded to belt out “Delta Dawn” like a seasoned pro, and by summer the song was a hit.

Tucker assured her success by releasing six consecutive Top Ten hits—including the #1s “What’s Your Mama’s Name,” “Blood Red and Goin’ Down,” and “Would You Lay With Me (in a Field of Stone)”—in two years, all produced by Sherrill. The narrative songs told daring stories that courted controversy, and Tucker’s mature-beyond-her-years vocal style brought out the drama and emotion in each.

Two years into her singing career, Tucker appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine—a rare national media spotlight for a country star in 1974. To her parents, Beau and Juanita Tucker, such recognition signified that their teen daughter had crossover potential that could take her beyond the country audience.

On October 10, 1974—Tucker’s sixteenth birthday—she signed a $1.4 million contract with MCA Records, a deal brokered by her ambitious father. Her seven years on MCA yielded the #1 hits “Lizzie and the Rainman.” “San Antonio Stroll,” and “Here’s Some Love.” In 1978, she recorded the rock-influenced album T.N.T. in Los Angeles.

In California, Tucker began dating singer Glen Campbell, twenty-two years her senior; their fiery, tabloid-filled relationship ended in acrimony.  After a stint with Arista Records, Tucker signed with Capitol Records and reunited with producer Jerry Crutchfield, with whom she had worked at MCA.

Tucker’s 1986 album, Girl Like Me, featured four Top Ten hits, including the #1 “Just Another Love.” She enjoyed a long run of success on Capitol (and sister label Liberty), with a string of Top Ten hits through 1997, including three consecutive #1s, “I Won’t Take Less Than Your Love,” “If It Don’t Come Easy,” and “Strong Enough to Bend.”

Tanya Tucker heard her name called as the 1991 CMA Female Vocalist of the Year while lying in a hospital bed, watching the awards show on TV. Earlier the same day, she had delivered her second child, Beau.

Her first child, daughter Presley, was born in July 1989—a year after Tucker had checked herself into the Betty Ford Center over issues with substance abuse. Her third child, Layla, arrived in 1999.

For Tucker, the CMA award came at a time when some radio stations refused to play her music while criticizing her choice to be a single mother. The CMA award, the first of her career, proved that the country music industry at large continued to support her. The national media cited Tucker’s win, and her eighteen Top Ten hits between 1988 and 1994, as signs that country music reflected the evolving roles of women in American society.

Tucker detailed her colorful life story in her1997 autobiography, Nickel Dreams: My Life. The singer also starred in her own reality show, Tuckerville, on cable network TLC. “Every one of us has good and bad times in our lives,” Tucker wrote in Nickel Dreams. “In my case, they have been to extremes.”

Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is operated by the Country Music Foundation, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization chartered by the state of Tennessee in 1964. The museum’s mission is the preservation of the history of country and related vernacular music rooted in southern culture.  With the same educational mission, the foundation also operates CMF Records, the museum’s Frist Library and Archive, CMF Press, Historic RCA Studio B and Hatch Show Print®.

More information about the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is available at countrymusichalloffame.org  or by calling (615) 416-2001.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

New: Moral Compass: Great Places to Go Where the Going Does Good

moralcompasstravel.info

Check out our newest travel site for special deals, insiders’ tips at tidbitts.com: http://www.tidbitts.com/karen-rubin/where-in-the-world

Advertisements

Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum Unveils Exhibit Spotlighting ‘Nashville’ TV Series

April 23, 2013

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum has just unveiled a special spotlight exhibition dedicated to ABC’s hit television series “Nashville” on April 5. “Nashville”: Like a Country Song, which will feature costumes, props and more from the acclaimed drama, will be located within the museum’s permanent exhibition on the second floor; the exhibit will run through October 31, 2013.

Artifacts on display in “Nashville”: Like a Country Song include:

  • A metallic-toned cocktail dress, with bronze paillette overlay and copper sequins and beading, and snakeskin-look platform peep-toe shoes, worn by Rayna Jaymes (Connie Britton) when she performed “Wrong Song” with Juliette Barnes.
  • A beaded, strapless mini-dress, worn by Juliette Barnes (Hayden Panettiere) when she and Rayna Jaymes performed “Wrong Song.”
  • A 2009 Gretsch G6121-1955 Chet Atkins solid body guitar and personalized strap played by Deacon Claybourne (Charles Esten) in the pilot episode of “Nashville.”
  • A Boho-inspired black lace dress with silky skirt, worn by Scarlett O’Connor (Clare Bowen).
  • A Gibson LG-2 guitar belonging to Gunnar Scott (Sam Palladio).
  • Framed art featured in the episode “You Win Again,” in which fictional record label Edgehill Republic throws a party to celebrate the platinum success of the Rayna Jaymes-Juliette Barnes duet “Wrong Song.”
  • A script of the “Nashville” pilot episode, autographed by cast members Powers Boothe, Clare Bowen, Connie Britton, Eric Close, Charles Esten, Jonathan Jackson, Sam Palladio, Hayden Panettiere and Robert Ray Wisdom.

“Nashville” airs on the ABC Television Network on Wednesdays, 10 – 11 p.m., PT/ET and is executive produced by Dee Johnson (“Boss,” “The Good Wife”), R.J. Cutler (“The September Issue,” “The War Room”), and Oscar®-winning screenwriter Callie Khouri (“Thelma and Louise”). The weekly drama focuses on the lives and careers of country music rivals Rayna Jaymes and Juliette Barnes, played by Connie Britton and Hayden Panettiere, respectively; the show also features a supporting cast of industry insiders, musicians, fledging artists and politicians. Filmed on location in Music City, the series gives viewers a realistic look inside the music industry. Khouri says the show “plays out like a country song. There’s heartbreak; there’s cryin’; there’s drinkin’. The whole notion is to live in the world of country music, so you’ll get everything that goes along with that.”

Each episode also features original songs, such as “Wrong Song” and “If I Didn’t Know Better,” performed by the actors. Executive music producer, T Bone Burnett—in league with co-producer and musician Buddy Miller—keeps the show’s tunes sounding authentic. This winning mix of music and drama made the series the most anticipated new show of autumn 2012: Among its many accolades, “Nashville” was described by the Los Angeles Times as “big, bold, wildly ambitious and great fun”; and Entertainment Weekly declared it “the best new show of the fall season, boldly soapy, seamlessly musical.”

Spotlight exhibits at the museum are narratives that supplement themes or aspects of the museum’s core exhibition, Sing Me Back Home: A Journey Through Country Music. These short-term, informal displays either provide a closer look at a particular person, group or aspect of country music, or spotlight recently donated items or special anniversaries. Rotated often, spotlight exhibits also offer a glimpse into the museum’s unique collection, which includes recorded discs, historical photographs, films and videotapes; thousands of posters, books, songbooks, periodicals and sheet music; personal artifacts such as performers’ instruments, costumes and accessories; and more.

Other current spotlight exhibits focus on Garth Brooks, Jack Greene, Minnie Pearl, Hargus “Pig” Robbins, Connie Smith and Dottie West.

Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is operated by the Country Music Foundation, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization chartered by the state of Tennessee in 1964. The museum’s mission is the preservation of the history of country and related vernacular music rooted in southern culture. With the same educational mission, the foundation also operates CMF Records, the museum’s Frist Library and Archive, CMF Press, Historic RCA Studio B and Hatch Show Print®.

More information about the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is available at countrymusichalloffame.org or by calling (615) 416-2001.

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

http://www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

Emancipation Proclamation on View at Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Feb 12-18

February 8, 2013
The Tennessee State Museum in Nashville, which has had ongoing exhibits marking the Civil War Sesquicentennial, will exhibit the Emancipation Proclamation, Feb. 12-18 - the only museum in the southeast on the Emancipation Proclamation Tour © 2013 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The Tennessee State Museum in Nashville, which has had ongoing exhibits marking the Civil War Sesquicentennial, will exhibit the Emancipation Proclamation, Feb. 12-18 – the only museum in the southeast on the Emancipation Proclamation Tour © 2013 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The Emancipation Proclamation will be on view at the Tennessee State Museum Feb. 12 -18. The document, which is making its only southeastern U.S. stop in Nashville, will only be on view for 72 hours over the seven days. After that, a facsimile of the document will be in the exhibit. The viewing is in conjunction with the Discovering the Civil War exhibition from Washington D.C.’s National Archives.

President Abraham Lincoln signed the document in 1863 proclaiming all those enslaved in Confederate territory to be forever free. 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation.

“It is an incredible honor for Tennessee to host the Emancipation Proclamation, a document whose significance to the history of this country, and this region in particular, cannot be overstated,” according to The Honorable Bill Haslam, governor of the Volunteer State. “This delicate manuscript represents America’s recognition that all are entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and we invite people from across the Southeast and the nation to see and celebrate with us the moment our country officially became the land of the free.”

Museum officials estimate that 300 people will be able to see the document each hour. However, time periods will be built in so that when no reservations are sold, lines can catch-up if they are running behind, or to let more people walk in if the line is running on time.

The Discovering the Civil War exhibit will continue at the museum through September 1, 2013. Many of the other items on display have never been publicly exhibited. Highlights include the original copy of the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery along with South Carolina’s 1860 declaration of secession. This popular traveling exhibit is free to the public, and the State Museum will be the last stop before these historic documents return to Washington D.C.

The exhibit is divided into 12 thematic areas that combine great original treasures, engaging touch screen interactive, and social media tools, all selected to illustrate the breadth of the conflict and to ask, “How do we know what happened?”

Reservations are on sale through TPAC Ticketing which has ticket windows on site in the same building as the museum. Visitors may obtain a reservation at the windows; going online to www.tpac.org; or by calling a local Nashville number 615-782-4040. There will be a handling charge of $1.00 paid to TPAC Ticketing for each reservation. There is no admission charge to see the document.

For additional updates on the Emancipation Proclamation and Discovering the Civil War, visit the museum’s website at www.tnmuseum.org. Discovering the Civil War was created by the National Archives and Records Administration and the Foundation for the National Archives.

For more information on Tennessee happenings, visit tnvacation.com, facebook.com/tnvacation, tnvacation.com/triptales/, instagram.com/tnvacation, twitter.com/tnvacation/ or pinterest.com/tnvacation/

See also:

Tennessee launches Civil War Heritage Trail in time for Sesquicentennial and slideshow

Women Play Dramatic, if Unheralded Roles in Civil War and slideshow

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

http://www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

Taylor Swift: Speak Now – Treasures from the World Tour Exhibition at Country Music Hall of Fame, Nashville

May 29, 2012

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum in Nashville is dedicated to the preservation of the history of country and related vernacular music rooted in southern culture © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum will explore superstar Taylor Swift’s record-breaking world tour with the exhibition Taylor Swift: Speak Now—Treasures from the World Tour, which opens on June 6, 2012, and runs through November 4, 2012. The exhibition will include dozens of costumes, instruments, set pieces and props from the six-time Grammy winner’s acclaimed 2011-12 Speak Now World Tour, which entertained more than 1.5 million fans over 111 shows in 19 countries spanning four continents.

“Taylor Swift’s Speak Now tour was one of the most successful tours in all of music, and she has been an ambassador for country music, raising awareness of our genre literally around the globe,” said Museum Director Kyle Young. “We are delighted to be able to bring our visitors up close and personal with many of their favorite elements from the show, from the colorful and elaborate stage costumes and beautiful instruments, to the magnificent ‘Juliet balcony’ that Taylor entered near the conclusion of each show and ‘flew’ around the circumference of each venue.

“Taylor is a dynamic live performer whose open heart and engaging personality allow her to make even the largest stadium shows an intimate experience,” Young continued. “Touring has always been a key element connecting music artists with their fans; those interactions help forge and strengthen the artist-fan relationship, and this exhibit speaks to that. And the opportunity came to us out of discussions we were having with Taylor related to our expansion—serendipity is a wonderful thing!”

Earlier this month, Swift pledged $4 million to fund a new education center at the museum. Swift’s gift, the largest capital contribution by an individual artist in the museum’s 45-year history, prompted the museum to name the new space the Taylor Swift Education Center. The center will open in early 2014. The gift was made in conjunction with the museum’s expansion capital campaign, Working on a Building: Country Music Lives Here.

Swift has for years been a generous supporter of the museum’s exhibitions, loaning the institution dresses, stage costumes and instruments for display; a free-standing, Taylor Swift multimedia exhibit has been one of the museum’s most popular attractions since its debut in May, 2010.

The Speak Now exhibition will recreate 10 vignettes from the tour, including the following artifacts:

· Taylor’s Roberto Cavalli ombre gold bugle-beaded dress and shimmering red Gibson Les Paul model electric guitar, featured during Swift’s performance of “The Story of Us”

· Taylor’s vintage ecru lace dress and Deering six-string banjo with rolled steel drum; fiddle player’s Marc by Marc Jacobs moss green crepe dress; male dancer’s soft-shoe costume including Brixton tartan plaid newsboy cap, shirt, pants, vest and oxfords; and numerous props including the 6’ x 8’ switchboard

· Taylor’s pale blue silk Marchesa gown with rhinestone bodice; and a white piano bench with tufted leather upholstery, both featured in “Back to December”

· Taylor’s red, sequined Jenny Packham slip dress and knee-high leather boots, worn during “Better Than Revenge”

· Taylor’s vintage purple silk halter dress; dancers’ costumes including a chiffon bridal gown with pearl- and bead-encrusted bodice, tulle veil and silk rose bouquet; two cotton-candy pink bridesmaids’ dresses with lace bodices and ruffled tulle skirts, and bouquets; groom’s ivory tuxedo and black pants; cleric’s vestments; and props including retro microphone, all featured during “Speak Now”

· Taylor brand koa wood ukulele with mother-of-pearl inlay, whose “happy sounds” Swift elicited during her acoustic performance of “Fearless”

· Taylor’s sleeveless, flesh-colored Reem Acra gown with sequin overlay; female dancer’s ballerina costume, comprised of a gold and ivory brocade bodice and pastel tulle tutu, embellished with pastel tulle flowers, seed pearls and beading; male dancer’s tunic and leggings; and prop trees; all featured in “Enchanted”

· Taylor’s re-worked vintage dress, featuring leather corsetry; and the mallet she used to ring the bells during her performance of “Haunted”

· Taylor’s black Jenny Packham flapper-style slip dress with rhinestone embellishments; black knee-high leather boots; and Taylor brand “sparkle” guitar encrusted with Swarovski crystals and featuring a headstock outlined in crystals and embellished with a crystal “13,” featured during “Long Live”

· Taylor’s golden Valentino ball gown, featuring layers of tulle and a sequin overlay; dancers’ and aerialists’ costumes; and the “Juliet balcony” in which Swift soared above the crowd during each performance of “Love Story.”

Accredited by the American Association of Museums, the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is operated by the Country Music Foundation, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization chartered by the state of Tennessee in 1964. The museum’s mission is the preservation of the history of country and related vernacular music rooted in southern culture. With the same educational mission, the foundation also operates CMF Records, the museum’s Frist Library and Archive, CMF Press, Historic RCA Studio B and Hatch Show Print®.

More information about the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is available at www.countrymusichalloffame.org or by calling (615) 416-2001.

See also:

Nashville: Where the Heart & Soul of Country Music Beats Strong
Nashville Richly Deserves its Moniker, ‘Music City, U.S.A.’

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

Montgomery Gentry Teams with Tim Gunn of ‘The Revolution’ for ‘Fashionable Journey’ Through Nashville Hotspots

April 25, 2012

Manuel, often referred to as the “Rhinestone Rembrandt,” in his signature showroom at 1922 Broadway in Nashville, where glittery couture is hand-made for country music stars © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

Country music duo Montgomery Gentry, who are never shy on style, play host to TV’s fashion expert Tim Gunn, taking him on a “fashionable journey” through Nashville’s hottest clothing stores for an episode of ABC’s ‘The Revolution”. The episode, showcasing the sights and sounds of Music City, is scheduled to air on Thursday, April 26 on ABC (check local listings and times).

Troy Gentry, whose style is best described as “country chic,” introduced Gunn to Aimee Johns at Flavour for Men (1522 Demonbreun Street, Nashville), who guided him through the latest styles of Music Row. Flavour Clothing for Men & Women is known for its unmatched client service and for carrying a large number of creative lines from New York to Los Angeles including Hudson, AG Jeans, Theory, John Varvatos, L.A.M.B., Hale Bob, Joes Jeans and 7 for all Mankind, to name a few. As one of the few boutiques in Nashville that will host private shopping opportunities to include in-store or in-home appointments for those who request it, Flavour is often frequented by Gentry, as well as many other country stars including such notables as Carrie Underwood, Luke Bryan, Blake Shelton, Reba McEntire, Kellie Pickler and more. (Flavour, www.flavourclothing.com, 615-254-2064).

After visiting Flavour, Eddie Montgomery, whose style can best be described as “traditional,” introduced Gunn to Morelia Ceuvas, daughter of famed costumer and artist, Manuel. Often referred to as theRhinestone Rembrandt,” Manuel (whose signature showroom is located at 1922 Broadway in Nashville), is known for making Johnny Cash the “man in black,” Elvis’ signature gold lamé suit, the garments Bob Dylan wore when performing for the Pope, and countless other stars including (but not limited to) members of The Rat Pack, Roy Rogers and the Lone Ranger. His work within the entertainment industry is world-renowned and received special recognition by the Country Music Association. The shop, Manuel American Designs, also known as Manuel Exclusive Clothier or simply Manuel’s, is a staple not only of Nashville but of Americana history. (Manuel’s, www.manuelcouture.com, 615-321-5444).

See also: Nashville: Where the Heart & Soul of Country Music Beats Strong

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville to Open The Bakersfield Sound: Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country Exhibit

February 22, 2012

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum will tell the story of the stars, sidemen and songwriters who created and popularized a new kind of country music in mid-20th century America in The Bakersfield Sound: Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country, a more than 5,000-square-foot exhibition on view March 23, 2012 through December 31, 2013 © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum will tell the story of the stars, sidemen and songwriters who created and popularized a new kind of country music in mid-20th century America in The Bakersfield Sound:  Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country, a more than 5,000-square-foot exhibition opening on Friday, March 23, 2012, and closing on December 31, 2013.

Narrated by Dwight Yoakam, the exhibit will explore the roots, heyday and impact of the Bakersfield Sound, the loud, stripped-down and radio-ready music most closely identified with the careers of Country Music Hall of Fame members Buck Owens and Merle Haggard.  Co-curated by the institution’s Curatorial Director Mick Buck, Photo Collection Manager Tim Davis and Museum Editor Michael Gray, the Bakersfield Sound exhibit includes more than 100 artifacts and a generous overlay of audiovisual treasure.

“We are incredibly excited to explore the Bakersfield Sound story,” said Museum Director Kyle Young.  “It’s an epic tale, born in the Great Depression, set two thousand miles from country music’s epicenter, and populated by a remarkably talented and tight-knit community of musicians who came together to invigorate and reinvent country music as they knew it.  These colorful artists infused their work with an aural intensity and independent spirit, in the process creating a sound that reverberates through country music to this day.

“We are grateful to all of the artists, musicians and families who shared their knowledge, memories and artifacts with us,” Young continued.  “An exhibit of this scope and magnitude would not have been possible without their cooperation.  We would also like to thank Dwight Yoakam for his participation: Dwight is an iconoclast whose rich musical catalog embodies the Bakersfield Sound tradition; he’s also a historian and fan who reveres the bedrock of this genre. I can’t think of anyone better than Dwight to guide our visitors on the Bakersfield journey.”

Grand opening weekend will be highlighted by a Saturday, March 24 panel discussion featuring Dallas Frazier, Don Maddox, Rose Lee Maphis, Buddy Mize, Country Music Hall of Fame member Jean Shepard and Red Simpson. Later that afternoon, all of the panelists will participate in a concert, headlined by Simpson, backed by West Coast bandleader and guitarist Deke Dickerson and other noted musicians from Tennessee and California. Other opening weekend programs include a Bakersfield Sound book talk, a film screening and an instrument demonstration (see complete details below).

The exhibit will also be accompanied by a richly detailed, lavishly illustrated, 96-page companion book, titled The Bakersfield Sound: Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country.  Published by the Museum’s Country Music Foundation Press and exclusively distributed by the Hal Leonard Corporation, the volume will include essays by California-based music journalists/historians Scott B. Bomar, Randy Poe and Robert Price.  Also included are dozens of archival photographs and beautiful color images of many of the artifacts included in the exhibit.  The book will be available in the Museum Store and at www.countrymusichalloffame.org.

Bakersfield Sound is supported by the Academy of Country Music, Ford Motor Company Fund and SunTrust.  Additional support was provided by Buck Owens Production Company.  Promotional support is being provided by media partners Great American Country Television Network and Cumulus Media.

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

The Bakersfield Sound story begins during the Great Depression, when Bakersfield’s cotton farms and oil fields attracted a mass migration of Dust Bowl refugees from Oklahoma, Texas and Arkansas.  Born in Texas in 1929, Buck Owens moved with his sharecropping parents to Arizona before heading to Bakersfield in 1951.  Merle Haggard’s family, driven to the area from their east-Oklahoma farm, lived in an old converted railroad boxcar when Haggard was born, in a Bakersfield hospital, on April 6, 1937.

The exhibit will explore Bakersfield’s club scene where, in the 1940s and 1950s, the city’s plethora of dance halls and honky-tonks provided respite for wall-to-wall, rambunctious workers eager for the boogiefied honky-tonk of the Maddox Brothers & Rose or the eclectic swing sound of Bob Wills.   Also on the bandstands were enormously influential musicians Wynn Stewart and Tommy Collins, whose classic honky-tonk songs Owens and Haggard would later record, and for whom they worked as sidemen before launching solo careers.

The exhibit also spotlights Bill Woods, widely regarded as “The Father of the Bakersfield Sound,” and other musical architects, including “Cousin” Herb Henson, Ferlin Husky, Billy Mize, Fuzzy Owen, Bonnie Owens, Jelly Sanders, Jean Shepard, Red Simpson and Lewis Talley.

One of Bakersfield Sound’s recurring themes is the connections between all of the artists making music during this fertile period.  This is epitomized by the careers of Bakersfield’s greatest stars, Owens and Haggard.  As they came to prominence in the 1960s, their careers and personal lives were interwined not only with each other but with virtually all of the other major figures of the Bakersfield scene.   These two superstars remained faithful to the classic honky-tonk style and, at the same time, gave country music a harder edge in keeping with the drinking, loud talking, fist-fighting and romancing that characterized Bakersfield’s nightclub culture.   Owens and his top-notch band, the Buckaroos, first popularized Bakersfield’s amped-up hybrid of honky-tonk, rockabilly and western swing with  1960s chart-toppers like “Act Naturally,” “Love’s Gonna Live Here,” “Together Again” and “I’ve Got a Tiger by the Tail” and Haggard and his equally stellar band, the Strangers, soon followed with the unforgettable gems “Sing Me Back Home,” “Mama Tried,” “Okie from Muskogee” and “The Fightin’ Side of Me.”   These Bohemian originals scored nearly 60 #l hits between them and created a body of work that continues to influence artists today.

The exhibit will also focus on the Bakersfield music businesses that evolved in the 1960s, including publishing houses, recording studios, booking and management agencies, radio stations and performance venues, and particularly on Buck Owens Enterprises, the music empire owned and operated by the savvy Owens.  It will also explore the enduring impact of the Bakersfield Sound on subsequent generations of musicians, singers and songwriters, from country-rock pioneers the Flying Burrito Brothers to Dwight Yoakam and Brad Paisley, and many others.

Among other narrative elements, visitors will learn about the importance of Capitol Records producer Ken Nelson, who recorded numerous Bakersfield classics, including many of Owens’ and Haggard’s hits, and who has been elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame; and the role of the Buckaroos and the Strangers in developing the Bakersfield Sound, with emphasis on key sidemen such as steel guitar innovator Ralph Mooney, Telecaster ace Roy Nichols and lead guitarist and harmony vocalist Don Rich. The Bakersfield-based Mosrite company, who manufactured instruments and issued recordings, also will be highlighted.

The Bakersfield Sound story will include hundreds of archival photos, audio and video clips, and a Fort Knox of rare, historic and visually stunning artifacts including:

·         Stage costumes worn by the Maddox Brothers & Rose, featuring floral motifs, elaborate embroidery and fringe, created by famed Hollywood designer Nathan Turk; Wynn Stewart’s understated Nudie suit with decorative straps and buckles; several Turk-designed suits worn by Buck Owens; a Nudie suit with motifs from the San Joaquin Valley, worn by Bobby Adamson of the Farmer Boys; and more.

·         A plethora of important instruments, including Telecasters belonging to Buck Owens and Don Rich; Speedy West’s Bigsby 1948 steel guitar (its whereabouts a mystery for decades); Ralph Mooney’s Fender double-neck pedal steel guitar; and Merle Travis’s electric guitar – one of the first solid-body electric guitars, designed by Travis and built by Paul Bigsby.

·         Legal documents including the marriage license of Buck and Bonnie Owens; and the “Full Pardon for Crimes of Merle Haggard,” signed March 1, 1972, by then-California Governor Ronald Reagan.

Weaving the expansive story together via video screens throughout the gallery is Yoakam, who created a one-of-a-kind oral history – with special guests Merle Haggard and Chris Hillman – especially for this exhibit; the interview was taped at Hollywood’s Capitol Records Tower, where many Bakersfield Sound hits were made.

Throughout its 21-month run, The Bakersfield Sound:  Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country will be accompanied by related public programs including live performances, films, panel discussions and more.  The schedule will be regularly updated at www.countrymusichalloffame.org.

With the purchase of a museum membership ($40/individual membership and $100/friends and family membership), visitors can attend most public programs free of charge for one year, including programming related to Bakersfield Sound.

More information about the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum is available at www.countrymusichalloffame.org or by calling (615) 416-2001.

See also:

Nashville: Where the Heart & Soul of Country Music Beats Strong
Nashville Richly Deserves its Moniker, ‘Music City, U.S.A.’

GRAND OLE OPRY SHOWS YOU CAN BE ‘OLE’ AND STILL BE NEW
85 Years Young and Still the Heart & Soul of Country Music

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

 

 

 

Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge 51st Birthday Bash in Nashville Features Kid Rock

October 15, 2011

Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge 51st Birthday Bash will take place on Wednesday, November 23 in association with Kid Rock, who is performing that evening at the Ryman Auditorium.

Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge owner Steve Smith announced today Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge 51st Birthday Bash will take place on Wednesday, November 23 in association with Kid Rock, who is performing that evening at the Ryman Auditorium as part of his nationwide tour giving money to and raising awareness for people in need.

“We couldn’t be happier that Kid Rock is working with us to make the Tootsie’s Birthday Bash a ‘rockin’ good time for everyone in Nashville,” comments Steve Smith. “Kid Rock is a part of Tootsie’s history. It’s going to be a memorable night.”

“Every time I end up at Tootsie’s it’s a good night, and I don’t expect this night to be any different. It’s cool to be celebrating their birthday party with them; I like parties and seem to excel in that type of atmosphere.” commented Kid Rock on the event.

Tootsie’s is known to have been used as a “green room” to some of the greatest Opry stars including Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, and Ernest Tubb. “Tootsies is where the stars would come to wet their whistles and pick their guitars,” adds Smith.

The Tootsie’s Birthday Bash will begin at noon in the streets on Broadway. Entertainment will be on both stages of Tootsies, the roof-top of Rippy’s, with a possible stage in the street. After the Kid Rock show, Tootsie’s will continue the celebration into the night!

Today, Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge is a must-see Music City destination for tourists and is frequented by locals, including some of the biggest names in country music, who often drop in and surprise patrons with impromptu performances. Kenny Chesney with classic rock icon Steve Miller, Kix Brooks, Montgomery Gentry, Kid Rock, Randy Houser, Jamey Johnson, Dierks Bentley, and Hank Williams, Jr. are among the artists who have recently performed there. For additional information, visit www.tootsies.net.

Tickets to Kid Rock’s show at the Ryman go on sale October 15th at 10 am CST. Ticket prices range from $45 – $85 and are available at TicketMaster or at the Ryman box office.

The Tootsies Birthday Bash will take place on lower Broadway starting at noon and will last deep into the night after the Kid Rock show.

See also:

Nashville: Where the Heart & Soul of Country Music Beats Strong

On the Town in Nashville, Music City U.S.A.

GRAND OLE OPRY SHOWS YOU CAN BE ‘OLE’ AND STILL BE NEW

 

 

Nashville’s Hermitage Hotel Ranked Among Top 10 Hotels in the U.S. by US News

June 24, 2011

The Hermitage Hotel, Nashville's historic grand hotel, was named by U.S. News named number six on its Best Hotels in the U.S. list, making it the only hotel located in the Southeast in the top 10 © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The Hermitage Hotel, Nashville’s historic grand hotel, was named by U.S. News named number six on its Best Hotels in the U.S. list, making it the only hotel located in the Southeast in the top 10.

After reviewing over 850 hotels in various destinations throughout the United States, U.S. News released this list of the top 10 percent, which has a total of 86 Best U.S. Hotels.

With the “Best Hotels” list in its inaugural year, the U.S. News team used a variety of criteria to review the hotels that made the list. According to U.S. News, “With an unbiased methodology, U.S. News evaluated close to 1,000 luxury hotels across 49 major U.S. destinations, analyzing ratings and awards from travel experts as well as user ratings. The result: rankings of the best hotels in each of those destinations.” The “Best Hotels” list will be updated annually. Additional information about The Hermitage Hotel’s ranking can be found on the U.S. News Travel Guide website here: http://tinyurl.com/3bppmfp

“It is a credit to the efforts of our tremendous staff that we continue to receive such distinctions as the U.S. News Best U.S. Hotels ranking,” said Greg Sligh, The Hermitage Hotel’s managing director. “Our guests consistently tell us that what separates and elevates their experience here is the genuinely friendly treatment they receive from our team members. They each feel like a valued family member.”

Other hotels on the Top 10 list include: The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples, Trump International Hotel & Tower, New York, Four Seasons Hotel, Las Vegas, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Central Park, New York, The Fairmont Olympic Hotel, Mandarin Oriental, San Francisco, Trump International Hotel & Tower, Chicago, Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea, and Elysian Hotel, Chicago.

In addition to the U.S. News Ranking, The Hermitage Hotel remains the only Forbes Five Star and AAA Five Diamond Award winning hotel in the state of Tennessee and in five of the eight contiguous states.

About The Hermitage Hotel and the Capitol Grille

Opened in 1910, The Hermitage Hotel, a member of Historic Hotels of America, has been woven into the history and memories of Nashville and her residents for over 100 years. In keeping with a deep respect for Nashville and the state of Tennessee, The Hermitage Hotel is committed to preserving the region’s heritage by putting into practice the traditions that make hospitality synonymous with The South.

This commitment extends to protecting the state’s historic and scenic landscapes through a relationship with The Land Trust for Tennessee. This relationship began in 2008 when a program was created in which guests may donate $2 for every night they stay in the hotel. To date guests have donated over $150,000.

The relationship was furthered in 2010 when the Trust graciously allowed the Capitol Grille to create a substantial period garden using sustainable practices on the property at Glen Leven. Glen Leven is an historic 66 acre farm located just 5 miles from The Hermitage Hotel and owned by the Land Trust for Tennessee. The Hermitage Hotel is the only Forbes Five Star and AAA Five Diamond hotel in Tennessee and five contiguous states.

The commitment to preservation continues in the hotel’s Capitol Grille and Oak Bar. Relaxed, low key, and known as the place for Nashvillians “in the know”, the Capitol Grille is the best example of a regionally inspired southern steakhouse in Nashville. Chef Tyler Brown has found the best source for heritage breed beef which now graze on the grasses at Glen Leven. The farm at Glen Leven also provides the vegetables that are used in all seasonally planned dishes. Chef Brown is actively involved with Share Our Strength, an organization whose mission is to end childhood hunger by 2015, and the Chef’s Move to Schools program, an offshoot of the Let’s Move program. Also, by supporting the Southern Foodways Alliance, the team at the Capitol Grille works to assure that the recipes and methods passed from generation to generation are not lost. The Capitol Grille is Nashville’s only Forbes Four Star and AAA Four Diamond restaurant.

The Hermitage Hotel is the most likely location in Nashville to find a Who’s Who of the entertainment world. Guests have included Tom Cruise, Jon Bon Jovi, Scarlett Johansson and the Jonas Brothers, among many others.

More information about the hotel can be found at: www.thehermitagehotel.com and www.facebook.com/#!/hermitagehotelnashville.

See also:

NASHVILLE’S RICH HERITAGE: Country Music’s Capital Shows Penchant for Classical

 

Gaylord Opryland Resort is offering Family-Friendly County Music Summer Vacation Packages

June 24, 2011

As part of Gaylord Opryland Resort's Ultimate Country Music Summer package, get an exclusive behind-the-scenes Backstage Tour of the Grand Ole Opry House © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

Located in the heart of the country’s capital of country music, Nashville, Tenn., the Gaylord Opryland Resort is offering a family-friendly County Music Summer vacation. Chock full of offerings that will appeal to every age, the amenities, accommodations, events and entertainment at each property will only be topped by the personable, memorable service that Gaylord is known for. Available weekends now through August 14, 2011, the Country Music Summer offers travelers exclusive backstage experiences, live entertainment and fun-filled family activities.

Two package offerings include the following:

The Ultimate Country Music Summer package including:

  • 1 or 2-night room accommodations
  • Waterin’ Hole Pool Party with live DJ, line-dance instruction, Country Guitar Hero Tournaments, games, dive-in movies, country karaoke
  • Preferred seat ticket to the world-famous Grand Ole Opry
  • Special welcome gift
  • “Comfort Foods and Country Music”. A rare experience, enjoy a dinner of mouthwatering Southern comfort foods backstage in the famous Studio A of the Opry House, plus “Music City in the Round” hosted by songwriter/artist, Bobby Tomberlin, featuring live performances by Nashville’s finest songwriters
  • Exclusive behind-the-scenes Backstage Tour of the Grand Ole Opry House
  • VIP Coupon Book valued at more than $250

The Country Music Summer Waterin’ Hole Party package includes:

  • 1 night room accommodations
  • Waterin’ Hole Pool Party with live DJ, line-dance instruction, Country Guitar Hero Tournaments, games, dive-in movies, country karaoke and more!
  • “Music and a Meal” at Jack Daniel’s Saloon
  • VIP Coupon Book valued at more than $250

 

Additional event and family activities that are available include:

Backstage Opry House Tour, “Comfort Foods and Country Music” followed by the Grand Ole Opry
Friday and Saturday, 4:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. at the Grand Ole Opry House

Country Look-A-Like Breakfast, Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. – 11 a.m.  at Solario

Music and a Meal, Friday and Saturday, 4 p.m.  at Jack Daniels Saloon

Waterin’ Hole Pool Party at Magnolia Pool

DJ (Sunday through Thursday from 1 – 5 p.m., Friday – Saturday from 1 – 6 p.m.)

Country Guitar Hero Tournament (daily, 2 – 3 p.m.)

Pool Games (daily 3 – 4 p.m.)

Country Karaoke (daily, 4 – 5 p.m.)

Line Dancing (Friday and Saturday, 5 – 7 p.m.)

Dive-In Movies (daily, 8 – 10 p.m.)

For more information, visit; to book, call 866-972-6779 or click.

See also:

Grand Ole Opry Shows You Can be ‘Ole’ and Still Be New

 

 

 

 

On the Town in Nashville, Music City U.S.A.

http://www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/Nashville_On_the_Town.html

 

Nashville: Where the Heart & Soul of Country Music Beats Strong

http://www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/Nashville_Heart_and_Soul_of_Country_Music.html

 

Nashville for Families

http://www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/Nashville-FamilyTravel.html

 

 

Gaylord Hotels Package Benefits Wounded Warrior Project

April 20, 2011

Gaylord National Resort just outside Washington DC. Guests who stay at any of the Gaylord Hotels this May now have the opportunity to help Wounded Warrior Project honor and empower America’s injured service men and women © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

Guests who stay at Gaylord Hotels this May now have the opportunity to help Wounded Warrior Project honor and empower America’s injured service men and women.

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is the featured charity for Gaylord Hotels’ Rooms for Good co-operative marketing and fundraising program for the month of May. The organization will receive 10 percent of the Rooms for Good package rate booked at all four of the brand’s resorts.

“Our goal is to provide unique programs and services to meet the needs of injured service members,” said Wounded Warrior Project Chief Development Officer Adam Silva. “It’s through the help of organizations like Gaylord Hotels and their Rooms for Good campaign that we’re able to continue this important work and support those who have given so much in defense of our country.”

Rooms for Good packages start at $179* per couple and include one-night accommodations and breakfast for two. A discounted package rate of $139* per couple is available for active and retired military.

The Rooms for Good program will feature a different charity each month. In addition to raising money for non-profit organizations, Gaylord Hotels will also raise awareness of the cause through its advertising, public relations and social media platforms.

“Our Rooms for Good program gives guests a chance to get away while giving back to an important cause,” said Amy Atkinson, Gaylord Hotels’ vice president of leisure marketing and public relations. “We are honored to support Wounded Warrior Project as they work to positively impact the lives of those who have sacrificed so much for our country.”

Over 40,000 troops have been physically wounded during the current military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hundreds of thousands more are estimated to be recovering from invisible wounds of war, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Whether through caregiver retreats, combat stress programs, career and education services, or adaptive sporting opportunities, WWP empowers warriors with the tools essential to not just survive their injuries but to thrive and achieve personal and professional success.

 *The rate varies per resort and excludes tax, parking and resort fee. More information is available at www.RoomsForGood.com

About Gaylord Hotels®
Owned and operated by Nashville, Tenn.-based Gaylord Entertainment, Gaylord Hotels® is a collection of four upscale resorts: Gaylord Opryland® in Nashville, Tenn.; Gaylord Palms® in Kissimmee, Fla., near Orlando; Gaylord Texan® on Lake Grapevine near Dallas, Texas, and Gaylord National® on the Potomac in National Harbor, Md. The brand’s hallmark— “everything in one place”— provides diverse dining options, quality spa and fitness center services, top-notch entertainment, on-site shopping and endless activities—all within each resort. For additional information, visit www.gaylordhotels.com.

About Wounded Warrior Project

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) raises awareness and enlists the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members, helps injured servicemen and women aid and assist each other, and provides unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. WWP is a national, nonpartisan organization headquartered in Jacksonville, FL. To get involved and learn more, visit www.woundedwarriorproject.org.

See also:

Gaylord National Resort turns family trip to Nation’s Capital into true vacation and slideshow

On the Town in Nashville, Music City U.S.A.