Posts Tagged ‘Palm Beach Zoo’

Palm Beach Zoo special summer programs include Zoo Camp, Friday night ‘Summer Safari’ with entertainment

May 29, 2012

The Palm Beach Zoo is one of the premier zoos in the country and a rich education program including Zoo Camp and Summer Safari nights makes it a destination attraction © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The Palm Beach Zoo has a host of special programs for summer.

Zoo Camp: Come for one week or the entire summer! Each week offers a unique wildlife theme as participants experience zoo keeping activities, behind-the-scenes tours, scavenger hunts, enriching conservation education activities, and interactive fountain time. Participants will enjoy up-close animal encounters, animal exhibit visits, crafts, games, and much more! Programs are offered for ages 5 – 17 years of age. (Reservations required. Weekdays – June 11 – August 17. Spaces are limited. Register Now! www.palmbeachzoo.org Click Education Programs.)

Other family education events this summer include:

Zoo Babies: Discover the different ways animals raise their young. Participants will hop out of pouches, fly from nests, and hatch out of eggs, then travel around the zoo to meet some of the zoo’s very own zoo babies.

2 year olds: 10:00—11:00 a.m. April 26 or May 5

3 & 4 year olds: 10:00—11:30 a.m. April 28 or May 19

Backyard Buddies: Come discover the zoo that’s in your own backyard! From owls to opossums, turtles to snakes, we’ll take a look at the amazing animals that call our backyards home!

2 year olds: 10:00—11:00 a.m. June 14

3 & 4 year olds: 10:00—11:30 a.m. June 23

Color Safari: How many colors can a chameleon be? Learn why color is so important in the world of wildlife, and meet some colorful animals up close.

2 year olds: 10:00—11:00 a.m. July 5

3 & 4 year olds: 10:00—11:30 a.m. July 7

Wings and Things: Flap like a bat, flutter like a butterfly, and fly like an eagle. Come discover the world of animals with wings!

2 year olds: 10:00—11:00 a.m. August 11

3 & 4 year olds: 10:00—11:30 a.m. August 18

Summer Safari Friday Nights

The Palm Beach Zoo stays open late every Friday evening beginning June 1 through October. In addition to daily operating hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Friday evening “Summer Safari” will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. These special summer hours are designed to offer families an opportunity to visit during the cool summer evenings.

Summer Safari evenings feature children’s entertainment, roving animal encounters and shows, complimentary rides on the Wildlife Carousel, live music in the Fountain Plaza, and dinner specials in the Tropics Café. Zoo Admission is free for Zoo Members. Non-members receive discounted admission of $14.95 for adults and $8.95 for children ages 3-12 during Safari Nights. The child’s admission will include a coupon for one free kid’s meal with purchase of an adult meal in the Tropics Café dining room.

The Palm Beach Zoo is located at 1301 Summit Boulevard, just east of I-95 between Southern and Forest Hill Boulevard. There is ample free parking. The zoo is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every day except Christmas and Thanksgiving Day. Open Fridays from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. June through October. For more information visit www.palmbeachzoo.org.

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www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

Palm Beach Zoo Invites Families for Sleepover

March 12, 2012

The Palm Beach Zoo has announced an opportunity for families to plan overnight adventures at the zoo. The “Night Owls Overnight Adventure” is available to family groups on Friday and Saturday nights by reservation. Dates are March 23, March 24, April 21, and April 28. © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The Palm Beach Zoo has announced an opportunity for families to plan overnight adventures at the zoo. The “Night Owls Overnight Adventure” is available to family groups on Friday and Saturday nights by reservation. Dates are March 23, March 24, April 21, and April 28.

Participants enjoy animal encounters, a night tour of the zoo, pizza snack, Continental breakfast and some wild nocturnal activities. This program is designed for participants ages 6 and over, and is limited to a maximum of 30 persons per night. At least one parent must accompany children.

Guests should arrive by 6:30 p.m. The overnight program begins at 7 p.m. and ends at 8:30 a.m. the following morning. Activities include up-close animal encounters, night tours of the zoo, crafts, games, evening pizza snack, and a Continental breakfast. The cost for Zoo Members is $35 per person. Cost for Non-Members is $45 per person.

For more information about this program, e-mail us at education@palmbeachzoo.org or call (561) 533-0887 ext. 229, or visit www.palmbeachzoo.org under Education Programs.

See also:

WHERE TO BE WILD IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

Popular Florida Panther is Euthanized at Palm Beach Zoo

March 8, 2012

Colin Patrick, 17-year-old Florida panther (Photo by Keith Lovett)

The Palm Beach Zoo in West Palm Beach Florida has euthanized “Colin Patrick”, a 17-year-old Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) that has been a favorite with zoo visitors throughout his life. Colin was born at the Palm Beach Zoo on St. Patrick’s Day in 1995 and lived in the Florida Wetlands section of the zoo.

Dr. Genevieve Dumonceaux, the zoo’s Clinical Veterinarian said, “Colin was recently diagnosed with a tumor that was compressing his spinal cord in the area between his shoulder blades. This was affecting his ability to use his rear legs and he became unable to walk. Examinations also showed advanced bone disease in the spine. Due to the inevitable progression of this problem and the lack of feasible and effective long term therapies for this geriatric panther, the staff of the Palm Beach Zoo animal department made the difficult decision that Colin should be humanely euthanized.”

“Very few animals in the history of the Palm Beach Zoo have touched the lives of as many guests and staff as Colin,” Keith Lovett, Assistant Director of the Palm Beach Zoo said. “In addition to the important role Colin played as an ambassador for his endangered species, he delighted zoo visitors with his playful demeanor and cunning personality. He will be sorely missed.”

Colin was the offspring of George, a Texas Cougar, and Tayke, a Florida Panther and was hand raised by Palm Beach Zoo staff and volunteers. He was one of only a few animals currently in captivity to have Florida panther lineage. His favorite activity was “stealth stalking” guests, volunteers and staff. His favorite foods were fish and large rodents.

At one time distributed throughout the state of Florida, now most of the surviving animals are found in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Everglades National Park, the zoo noted.

Their habitat is varied and includes swamp, forest and ranchland.  They prefer to feed on wild pigs and white-tailed deer, but will also hunt raccoons, armadillos, and small alligators.

Panthers can reach 6-7 feet from nose to tail; adults can weigh between 70 and 150 pounds, and they can live up to 12 years in the wild, longer in captivity. Colin was 17 years old.

These cats are usually solitary but come together during breeding season. Females generally give birth to a litter of 1 to 4 kittens after a gestation period of 90-95 days. They usually breed every other year, but females will come into estrus sooner if the litter is lost. The young are born with spots that tend to fade after 6 months of age. Young typically nurse for 2 months and will stay with the mother for up to 2 years.

Florida panthers, the official state animal of Florida, are listed as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. In 1993, the population was estimated to be 30 to 50 animals and current numbers are believed to have only reached 100. Radio collar monitoring and camera traps are being used to help save the Florida panther. The main threats to their existence are habitat loss and fragmentation as well as automobile collisions.

See also:

WHERE TO BE WILD IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

 

Palm Beach County Holds First Annual Pet Amnesty Day on January 14

January 1, 2012

Palm Beach Zoo, where you can see jaguar, is assisting in Palm Beach County's first annual Pet Amnesty Day. © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

Palm Beach County is holding its First Annual Pet Amnesty Day on Saturday, January 14, when the public will be invited to surrender any exotic nonnative animals they may be keeping as pets – no penalties and no questions asked.

The event will be held at the West Palm Beach Garden Club in Dreher Park behind the Palm Beach Zoo and next to the South Florida Science Museum.

Surrendered animals will be accepted between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Surrendered animals will be checked by a veterinarian, micro-chipped, and made available for adoption by experienced individuals who are capable of caring for them. Animals that will be accepted for surrender include reptiles, amphibians, mammals, birds, fish and invertebrates. Domestic animals will not be accepted.

Pet Amnesty Day will be hosted by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA), and the Palm Beach Zoo, and is sanctioned by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

The January 14th event is free and open to the public. Live animals will be on display and experts from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Palm Beach Zoo and the Nature Conservancy Python Patrol will be on hand for conversations and questions about exotic pets. The event will also feature children’s activities and informational/educational exhibitors.

The surrendered animals will be made available for adoption after 2 p.m. Nonnative pet adopters must be experienced and must have already applied and been approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; they must bring their acceptance letters with them. Adopter applications can be found at www.myFWC.com/nonnatives. Becoming an adopter is free.

See also:

WHERE TO BE WILD IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

For more travel features, visit:

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin