Posts Tagged ‘American Museum of Natural History’

American Museum of Natural History Re-opening of Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Marked by Special Events Oct 27 and Year-Round

October 9, 2012

On Saturday, October 27, New York City’s iconic American Museum of Natural History is re-opening one of its greatest treasures: the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial.

The recently restored two-story Memorial — which includes the iconic Central Park West façade, Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda, and Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall — serves as New York State’s official memorial to its 33rd Governor and the nation’s 26th President. The Hall includes a new exhibition charting Roosevelt’s journey from budding naturalist to an elected leader committed to conservation.

Long before he was President and placed some 230 million acres of land under federal protection, Roosevelt was a boy whose father helped to found this Museum. And Roosevelt’s ongoing relationship with Museum scientists, such as ornithologist Frank Chapman, helped seed the American conservation movement.

To celebrate this larger-than-life man, his love for nature, and his instrumental role in the American conservation movement, the Museum is launching a year of events, lectures, and special programs.

The Museum on October 27 will celebrate this momentous occasion with a day of inspiring programs for naturalists and museum-lovers of all ages. Exhibition experts will discuss how art and science combine to great effect in the Museum’s world-renowned dioramas; you can get up close with falcons and owls in live-animal encounters; enjoy Roosevelt-themed tours; see rare items from our collection, and much more.

To receive updates on programs and activities, or to see photos and videos captured behind the scenes at the Museum, click this link, http://tr-action.amnh.org/tr-updates

American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, Phone: 212-769-5100 http://www.amnh.org

American Museum of Natural History Hosts Cherry Blossoms, Japan Fest March 14-17

March 12, 2012
The American Museum of Natural History Global Weekends: Cherry Blossoms: Japan Fest is commemorating the first anniversary of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster during activities March 14-17 featuring SAORI weaving, a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, Okinawan dance, a Taiko drum performance, and a shadow puppet troupe © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The American Museum of Natural History Global Weekends: Cherry Blossoms: Japan Fest is  commemorating the first anniversary of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster during activities March 14-17 featuring SAORI weaving, a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, Okinawan dance, a Taiko drum performance, and a shadow puppet troupe.

As part of the Japan-U.S. Cherry Blossom Centennial celebration of the Consulate General of Japan located in New York, AMNH will include four days of family friendly activities and programs showcasing many of the arts and traditions that reflect the spirit of the Japanese people and their appreciation of nature through live performances, interactive demonstrations, and workshops. Local New York City-based Japanese cultural organizations will be on-site to perform and demonstrate their art. Activities include SAORI weaving and cherry blossom installation simulating the spring ohanami  (viewing of the cherry blossoms) by Loop of the Loop; origami paper models instruction by OrigamiUSA; flower arranging by Judy Hata from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana; a cherry blossoms ink brush painting demonstration by Metro NY Sumi-e Society; and a traditional Japanese tea ceremony by Yoshihiro Terazono, tea master of the Urasenke Chanoyu Center in New York City. In addition, a three-part workshop on traditional outfit making will be offered to registered participants.

On Saturday, March 17, the celebration culminates with a traditional matsuri or folk dance festival. The day begins with a Shinto blessing ceremony by the International Shinto Foundation and welcome remarks from Ambassador Shigeyuki Hiroki, Consul General of Japan in New York; President Gary Moriwaki, Japanese American Association; and William Castro, Manhattan Borough Commissioner, NYC Department of Parks & Recreation. The program includes a performance by the Okinawan Miyagi Ryu Ryukyu Dance School, Soh Daikodrum group, and, from Japan, a shadow puppet troupe performance of the folktale Princess Kaguya by Silhouette Theater TSUNOBUE. Sushi will also be featured in the Museum’s Food Court or Café on One that day.

 The Presenting Sponsor of the Museum’s cultural public programming is MetLife Foundation.

Cherry Blossoms: Japan Festis made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Support for Global Weekends is made possible, in part, by the Ford Foundation, the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., and the family of Frederick H. Leonhardt.

Cherry Blossoms: Japan Festisa part of the Japan-U.S. Cherry Blossom Centennial, supported by Consulate General of Japan in New York.

Visiting the American Museum of Natural History

The American Museum of Natural History, founded in 1869, is one of the world’s preeminent scientific, educational, and cultural institutions. The Museum encompasses 45 permanent exhibition halls and galleries for temporary exhibitions, the Rose Center for Earth and Space with the Hayden Planetarium, state-of-the-art research laboratories and five active research divisions that support more than 200scientists in addition to one of the largest natural history libraries in the Western Hemisphere and a permanent collection of more than 32 million specimens and cultural artifacts. Through its Richard Gilder Graduate School, it is the first American museum authorized to grant the Ph.D. degree. In 2012, the Museum will begin offering a pilot Master of Arts in Teaching with a specialization in earth science. Approximately 5 million visitors from around the world came to the Museum last year, and its exhibitions and Space Shows can be seen in venues on five continents. The Museum’s website and growing collection of apps for mobile devices extend its collections, exhibitions, and educational programs to millions more beyond its walls. Visit amnh.org for more information.

The Museum offers a broad array of programs for adults, children, families, students, educators, and scientists. These range from special exhibitions to symposia, lecture series, workshops, and film festivals. Highlights include Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration (November 19,2011–August12, 2012),which offers a vision of the future of space travel as it boldly explores our next steps in our solar system and beyond; the Hayden Planetarium Space Show, Journey to the Stars, narrated by Whoopi Goldberg; The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter(October 8, 2011–May 28, 2012),an annual exhibition that features up to 500live, free-flying tropical butterflies; Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies(June 25, 2011–June 24, 2012), an exhibition ofstunning large-format photographs captured by high-tech imaging devices used by Museum scientists in their research; and a year-round calendar of engaging and educational public programs that feature dynamic encounters with living cultures and authentic science.

The Museum is open daily, 10 am–5:45 pm. The Museum is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Suggested general admission, which supports the Museum’s scientific and educational endeavors and offers access to the Museum’s 45 halls including the Rose Center for Earth and Space, is $19 (adults) suggested, $14.50 (students/seniors)suggested, $10.50 (children) suggested. All prices are subject to change.

The Museum offers discounted combination ticket prices that include suggestedgeneral admission plus special exhibitions, IMAX films, and Space Shows.

o Museum Plus One includes one special exhibition, IMAX film, or Space Show: $25(adults), $19 (students/seniors), $14.50 (children)

o Museum Supersaver includes all special exhibitions, IMAX film, and Space Show: $33(adults), $25.50 (students/seniors), $20.50 (children)

Visitors who wish to pay less than the suggested Museum admission and also purchase a ticket to attend a special exhibition, IMAX film, or Space Show may do so on-site at the Museum. To the amount they wish to pay for general admission, they should add $22 (adults), $18 (students/seniors), or $12 (children) for a Space Show, special exhibition, or IMAX film.

 For additional information, the public can call 212-769-5100 or visit the Museum’s website at amnh.org.

Prepare for your Museum visit by downloading the new American Museum of Natural History Explorer App, a groundbreaking enhanced navigation tool available for free from the App Store on iPhone and iPod touch or atwww.iTunes.com/appstore/.The Explorer pinpoints your location within the Museum and offers turn-by-turn directions and customized tours, a fossil treasure hunt, and social media links for posting to Facebook and Twitter.

Become a fan of the Museum on Facebook at facebook.com/naturalhistory, or visit twitter.com/AMNH to follow us on Twitter.

See also:

NYC’s American Museum of Natural History sends you Beyond Planet Earth and slideshow

 NASA Astronauts answer questions at AMNH’s Rose Center for Earth and Space and slideshow

For more travel features, visit:

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www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

American Museum of Natural History Hosts ‘Mystery at the Museum’ Adventures

December 6, 2011

The American Museum of Natural History is presenting Mystery at the Museum, a 90-minute adventure that sends participating “detectives” through the Museum to investigate the halls and encounter characters along the way to aid in their journey © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The American Museum of Natural History, in collaboration with Accomplice—theatrical experiences set on the streets of New York City, Hollywood, and London—presents Mystery at the Museum, a unique public program and educational adventure for families and friends. Using the storied institution as its stage, this original production takes participants on an exciting journey through the Museum’s halls, exhibits, and behind-the-scene locations.

Mystery at the Museum begins with a tale and quest for the inheritance of Chester Q. Cooperspenny, an eccentric billionaire and world explorer. The 90-minute production sends participating “detectives” through the Museum to investigate the halls and encounter characters along the way to aid in their journey. Limited to 10 people per tour, Mystery at the Museum encourages participants to use their observational skills and deductive reasoning, while working as a team to complete their mission. Part of the challenge is figuring out who in the Museum is part of the story and who is not. Engaging, comical, and poignant, Mystery at the Museum is an enjoyable experience for the entire family.

This December, Mystery at the Museum’s talented cast turns up the holiday humor with whimsical references to Santa Claus, holiday meals, and other festivities. The actors engage, entertain, and educate participants—and unsuspecting Museum visitors—as they celebrate the season while helping to solve the Mystery at the Museum.

Mystery at the Museum is a weekend program with eight daily performances. It is appropriate for participants 10years old and up.

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.

Follow the Museum on Twitter at twitter.com/amnh, on Facebook atfacebook.com/naturalhistory, on YouTube at youtube.com/AMNHorg, on Flickr atflickr.com/amnh, and on Tumblr at amnhnyc.tumblr.com.

American Museum of Natural History hosts 16th Annual Spooktacular Halloween Celebration

October 15, 2011

 

The American Museum of Natural History is inviting one and all to its 16th Annual Spooktacular Halloween Celebration, Monday, Oct. 31, 4-7 pm.

The American Museum of Natural History is inviting one and all to its 16th Annual Spooktacular Halloween Celebration, Monday, Oct. 31, 4-7 pm.

The Cat in the Hat, Curious George®, Clifford the Big Red Dog®, Miffy, Toot and Puddle, Peter RabbitTM, Llama Llama, Danny’s Dinosaur, Teddy Roosevelt, and WordGirl are among the characters who will greet thousands of costumed children as they arrive at the American Museum of Natural History to celebrate Halloween.

Guests can wander among “dangerous” dinosaurs, “eerie” elephants, and the “uncanny” universe when more than 30 of the Museum’s halls open on Halloween for trick-or-treating, arts and crafts, fun with roaming cartoon characters, and live performances by David Grover and the Big Bear Band, Louie & Subanda, stiltwalkers, and the Big Nazo puppet troupe.

Tickets are $10 ($9Members). Special Monster Meal packages (choice of chicken nuggets or hamburger, fries, and a soda), which include admission, are available for $19 ($18 Members).

To reserve tickets, call 212-769-5200 or visit www.amnh.org/halloween.

American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79thStreet.

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Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-135 Mission Astronauts to Visit New York’s American Museum of Natural History, Aug 16

August 8, 2011

Hundreds of young people will greet four astronauts from space shuttle Atlantis’ STS-135 mission at their first New York public appearance since completing their mission July 21.

 

The American Museum of Natural History will hold a public event, Tuesday, August 16, 10:30-11:30 am to celebrate this historic mission, which marks the end of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program, and will welcome Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley, and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim. The astronauts will speak briefly about their experiences and answer questions from New York City children in the audience. This event is free with Museum admission.

 

This event is free with Museum admission. Suggested general admission, which supports the Museum’s scientific and educational endeavors and offers access to the Museum’s 46 halls including the Rose Center for Earth and Space, is $19 (adults) suggested, $14.50(students/seniors) suggested, $10.50 (children) suggested. For tickets, call 212-769-5200 or visit amnh.org.

For more travel features, visit

www.travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

MYSTERY AT THE MUSEUM IS NEW WAY TO EXPERIENCE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY IN NYC

April 20, 2011

The American Museum of Natural History is known for its thought-provoking exhibits like "Brain: The Inside Story" © 2011 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

From the creators of Accomplice—theatrical experiences set on the streets of New York City, Hollywood, and London—comes an exciting new way to explore the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Part walking tour, part game, and part theater, Mystery at the Museum is an immersive adventure through the Museum’s halls. Meet characters, follow clues, and solve puzzles as you unravel a tale that takes you through iconic Museum locations and behind-the-scenes areas. Challenging and engaging, comical and poignant, Mystery at the Museum is an experience you won’t soon forget.

Mystery at the Museum is offered Saturdays and Sundays (8 performances per day; each performance runs approximately 2 hours) Admission is $50 (10 and up); advance purchase is required.

For more information and to book tickets, visit: http://www.amnh.org/calendar/event/Mystery-at-the-Museum:-An-Accomplice-Adventure/

World’s Largest Dinosaurs

Meanwhile, the museum best known for its dinosaurs has just opened its newest blockbuster exhibit The World’s Largest Dinosaurs (on view April 16, 2011–January 2, 2012). The World’s Largest Dinosaurs  focuses on sauropods, a group that includes the largest animals ever to have walked on Earth. Sauropod dinosaurs were extraordinarily successful, surviving for more than 100 million years. The World’s Largest Dinosaurs examines the biology and behavior of sauropods, looking particularly at how these animals evolved to such tremendous sizes. he highlight of the exhibition will be a life-sized model of the 60-foot-long sauropod Mamenchisaurus. The dramatic model is fully fleshed out on one side, while the other side will be a “visible dinosaur,” revealing bones, muscles, and internal organs. The exhibition also features specimens from the Museum’s collections of sauropod teeth, vertebrae, skin impressions, and a variety of other ancient specimens. Hands-on, computer-based activities let visitors investigate adaptations that allowed these animals to grow so big. The World’s Largest Dinosaurs is organized by the American Museum of Natural History (www.amnh.org) in collaboration with Coolture  Marketing, Bogotá, Colombia.

To plan a visit, go to http://www.amnh.org. Find the American Museum of Natural History on Facebook at facebook.com/naturalhistory or visit twitter.com/AMNH to follow on Twitter.

See also

‘Brain: The Inside Story’ at American Museum of Natural History makes you think

HAYDEN PLANETARIUM PREVIEWS TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE AT WINTER SOLSTICE PARTY

December 8, 2010

While at the American Museum of Natural History, be sure to see Brain: The Inside Story © 2010 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium invites visitors to preview the stars of the winter season and the total eclipse of the Moon which takes place early the next day, during its Winter Solstice Party on Monday, December 20 from 6:30-8 pm. Parts of four continents will be treated to a view of a total lunar eclipse early on the morning of December 21, and Hayden Planetarium astronomers say the view from New York will be the best of its kind until the year 2014.

Join astronomers Steve Beyer, Joe Rao, and Ted Williams, as well as members of the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York, as they prepare prospective eclipse watchers for the lunar show on the final full night of the autumn season. The evening’s festivities will include hot cocoa and, weather permitting, observations of celestial objects through telescopes and binoculars on the Rose Center for Earth and Space’s Arthur Ross Terrace. There will also be a simulation on the dome in the Hayden Space Theater of this year’s winter solstice eclipse using the world’s most advanced star projector, the Zeiss Mark IX.

A total lunar eclipse occurs only when a full Moon, the Earth, and the Sun are in a direct line that allows the Earth’s shadow to fall on the face of the Moon. In the New York area, the eclipse will officially begin on December 21 at 12:29 am as the Moon begins to enter Earth’s outer, or penumbral, shadow. But viewers will not notice any dramatic changes in the Moon’s appearance until1:33 am, when the partial phase of the eclipse begins and the Earth’s dark shadow–called the umbra–starts to slowly creep over the face of the Moon. At 2:41 am the eclipse will reach totality, but sunlight bent by our atmosphere around the curvature of the Earth should produce a coppery glow on the Moon. Totality ends at 3:53 am and the Moon will completely emerge from the umbra to return to its full brilliance at 5:01 am.

Unlike an eclipse of the Sun, an eclipse of the Moon presents no hazards to the viewer. No precautions to protect the eyes are needed. The last total eclipse of the Moon seen in New York occurred on February 20, 2008, and there will not be another until April 14, 2014.

Winter Solstice Party admission is $15; $13.50 (Museum members, students and senior citizens). Tickets can be purchased online at: http://www.amnh.org/calendar/category/Hayden-Planetarium-Programs/

Also see the blockbuster exhibit on view, “Brain: The Inside Story”