Archive for the ‘weather’ Category

AccuWeather: California Ski Resorts On Pace to Extend Season with Abundant Snowfall

March 22, 2016
Skiing down the California Trail at Heavenly Resort, Lake Tahoe © 2016 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

Skiing down the California Trail at Heavenly Resort, Lake Tahoe © 2016 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

By Brian Lada, Meteorologist for AccuWeather.com

AccuWeather reports  this year’s ski season in California is on pace to be one of the longest seasons in the past several years due to the abundance of mountain snow that El Niño has delivered.

This is a significant turnaround from the past several winters when ski resorts in California were forced to close early due to a lack of snow.

Last season, Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area closed on Jan. 29. According to Ashely Quadros, the resort’s marketing content coordinator, the mountain typically stays open until the middle of April.

Other ski resorts echoed the return to a normal or a longer-than-normal season.

“We’ve come off of a couple pretty low snow years and this season has really been a return to a normal snow year for us,” Lauren Burke, public relations manager for Mammoth Mountain Ski Area, said.

Mammoth Mountain usually open their slopes around the middle of November and they remains open through Memorial Day weekend.

However, this winter is on pace to be an extended season for the ski resort due to the stormy El Niño weather pattern.

According to Burke, Mammoth Mountain opened ahead of schedule this season due to early-season storms, allowing skiers and snowboarders to hit the slopes about a week earlier than normal.

Additionally, the feet of snow that fell over California’s mountain ranges during the first half of March will help the resort stay open through the entire spring.

“We’re committed to staying open through Memorial Day, and then we [will] just reassess week by week how our snowpack is holding up,” Burke said. “So depending on how late-season storms come through, we’re really looking forward to a long season.”

Not only will ski resorts in California be able to stay open later this season, but they will also have more trails and terrain parks open for skiers and snowboarders.

“The terrain that we’re going to have available as we move through the spring is going to be a lot larger [than last year],” Burke said.

The increased snowfall and extended length of this year’s ski season has been a significant help to the ski industry in California following multiple years with poor conditions.

“With more snow comes higher visitation,” Burke said. “We’ve already surpassed last season’s total ski visits number, so we’ve definitely seen a great pickup this year and we are having a strong financial year.”

Following the snow drought and shorter season last year, some resorts are touting that winter of 2015-2016 ranks among their top seasons.

“This season has been our best yet and we can’t wait to see what else Mother Nature brings us [next] season,” Quadros added.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

goingplacesfarandnear.com

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

moralcompasstravel.info

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/

goingplacesfarandnear.tumblr.com/

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

Fireballs to Flash in November Night Sky as Taurid Meteor Shower Peak

November 5, 2015

accuweather-taurid meteor

By Brian Lada, Meteorologist for AccuWeather.com 

AccuWeather Global Weather Center – AccuWeather reports cosmic fireballs will occasionally light up the night sky as the Taurid meteor shower approaches its peak into next week.

“Every year, the Earth passes through a stream left by Comet Encke, producing the Taurid Meteor Shower,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Dave Samuhel said.

“This shower is notorious for producing fireballs, and there are signs that this could be a year of enhanced activity,” Samuhel added.

Fireballs are extremely bright meteors that last for several seconds and can light up an entire countryside when they are at their brightest.

Unlike other meteor showers thought the year, the peak of the Taurid shower is drawn out, lasting nearly a week.

This year, the peak is expected to occur from Nov. 5 through Nov. 12, but some meteors from the Taurids will continue through the end of the month.

The long peak of the shower means that stargazers will have several opportunities to see the Taurids, and one cloudy night should not prevent people from catching the display.

“Usually the shower only produces 5-10 meteors per hour,” Samuhel said.

The best time for viewing the Taurids may prove to be near the end of the shower’s peak during the new moon.

The new moon will mean that the sky will be darker, making the Taurids appear even brighter as they glide across the night sky.

As for when to look for the Taurids, there is no specific time of the night that will bring more shooting stars than another time of the night.

Whenever it is dark, you’ll have the chance to see some fireballs flash as they streak through the night sky.

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

goingplacesfarandnear.com

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

moralcompasstravel.info

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

Accuweather US Winter Forecast: Northeast to Dodge Winter’s Brutal Cold; Rain, Snow to Dent California Drought

October 9, 2015

Accuweather-Winter15

Where will the skiing be best this winter? Where will it be brutally cold? According to AccuWeather’s 2015-16 U.S. Winter Forecast, winter will kick off with mild weather in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic as an intensifying El Niño influences the weather pattern across the country.

El Niño will drive heavy rain and mountain snow to California, helping to replenish reservoirs but also threatening to cause flooding and mudslides. Meanwhile, a rain deficit will continue to build in the Northwest.

Here is a regional breakdown of the AccuWeather.com 2015-2016 U.S. Winter Forecast:

Brutal Cold Won’t Return to Northeast, Mid-Atlantic; Weak Lake-Effect Season in Store for Great Lakes

After the winter of 2014-2015 brought brutal cold to the northeastern United States, this season is set to be milder overall, but particularly during the early part of the season.

“We just don’t know exactly yet whether or not we’re going to see the pattern turn cold and snowy,” AccuWeather Expert Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said. “…There is an opportunity that [the weather] could change on us as we get into February and early March.”

Regardless, the Northeast and mid-Atlantic can expect fewer days of subzero temperatures than last year. February of 2015 went down in the record books as the second-coldest February on record for both the region and for eight states individually, including Pennsylvania, New York and all six New England states.

Farther west, in the Great Lakes region, a lack of arctic air for much of the early and midwinter will lead to a weak lake-effect season, causing snowfall and precipitation totals to fall below normal.

Upstate New York and northern New England are not in the clear, however, as rain events along the coast early in the season can translate to snow in the higher elevations.

Severe Weather to Grip Southeast, Gulf Coast States

As one of the strongest El Niños in the last 50 to 60 years continues to develop, it’s likely that heavy rainfall and severe weather will take aim at the Southeast and Gulf Coast.

El Niño patterns often result in severe weather outbreaks for this region as bigger, stronger systems are able to take a southern storm track.

Florida, in particular, may have a higher risk for tornadoes this season. Southern Georgia and South Carolina are also at a higher risk for severe weather events.

Overall, heavy rain will be widespread for the South. As the season progresses, additional rain on an already saturated ground will increase the chances for flooding.

“As far as the biggest impacts go, I would look at Shreveport and New Orleans, Louisiana, and Mobile, Alabama. I think those areas are going to get hit with a lot of rain,” Pastelok said.

Springlike Highs to Visit Northern Plains on Occasion; Below-Normal Temperatures to Grip Southern Plains

Wintry weather will become active early on in the northern Plains, with the potential for a few snowstorms as early as November and December.

As is typical for this region, however, the weather pattern will be a roller coaster, causing wintry weather to back off in the middle of the season and return again just before spring.

“There will be a good portion of the middle part of the season where [the weather] doesn’t do a lot, but the bookends can get pretty active,” Pastelok said.

At times, temperatures in the north-central Plains could soar into the 50s or even the 60s F for a couple of days as mild weather is pushed out from the Northwest and northern Rockies.

In the southern Plains, the building El Niño will dictate an active southern storm track, meaning the region could end up with above-normal precipitation.

Below-Normal Snowfall to Exacerbate Drought Woes in Northwest, Northern Rockies

Below-normal precipitation, in the form of both rain and snow, and above-normal temperatures will define the season across the Northwest and northern and eastern Rockies.

For the season as a whole, the region is likely to end up with snowfall totals much below normal.

“Ski areas in the northern Rockies may be missing out on significant fresh snowpack. They’re going to have to make most of their snow at night,” Pastelok said.

The dryness across the area could eventually translate to building drought conditions if spring rain is not abundant.

Wet, Snowy Conditions to Frequent the Southwest

Wet and snowy conditions will frequent the southwestern United States this winter.

“It may not happen early on, but by the middle of the season, I think they’re going to get hit very hard and frequently,” Pastelok said. “That’s going to put a lot of snow in the mountains and cause a lot of rain in the valley and desert areas.”

“Phoenix, Arizona, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, should prepare for significant precipitation this season. “These cities are not going to miss out this year,” according to Pastelok.

Across the region, a few precipitation events will occur during November and December, but things will pick up deeper into the season.

“January and February will bring more frequent heavy events,” he said.

El Niño to Send Rain, Snow to Parched California

“There’s good news and bad news for California,” according to Pastelok.

El Niño will help to set up a pattern of rain and snow for California, which is still dealing with devastating drought conditions and rampant wildfires.

Copious amounts of rain from systems over the same area, a theme which occurs often during this type of weather pattern, can lead to problems for California.

The state is dealing with more than 9 million acres of wildfire-charred land, more than 2.5 million acres more than the 10-year average.

“[The heavy rain] is going to lead to patterns in the mud where water will travel rapidly and lead to flooding,” Pastelok said. “It’s going to lead to developing streams and rivers that are not supposed to be there, and you’re going to get localized street flooding in the cities.”

Mudslides and basement flooding may also prove devastating for homeowners.

However, there’s a silver lining: The 2015-2016 season may yield triple the amount of snow than that which fell last year in the central and northern mountains.

“This is what fills the reservoirs in the spring and early summer,” Pastelok said.

Central California will finally experience the feast that follows famine. Pastelok believes his forecast may even be conservative for this area.

While the rain and snow will put a dent in the water crisis, it won’t result in the be-all and end-all residents are hoping for.

“Will it be enough? I think we need a couple of these kinds of years and I’m not sure we’re going to get that,” Pastelok said.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

goingplacesfarandnear.com

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

moralcompasstravel.info

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate/

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

 

Heaviest Snow in Storm Train to Hit New York State to New England by Monday, Feb. 9

February 8, 2015
AccuWeather.com

AccuWeather.com

The last in a series of storms bringing snow to part of the Northeast this weekend will bring the heaviest snow and greatest disruptions to travel and daily activities during Monday, February 9, 2015, according to AccuWeather.com.

Up until Sunday night, the storms will bring light snow with a few exceptions from northern Minnesota, northern Michigan, New York state and New England.

The caboose in the train of storms will end up being the strongest and will bring the heaviest amount of snow by early next week, said Alex Sosnowski, Expert Meteorologist for AccuWeather.com.

The steadiest snow from Sunday night into Monday night will fall from New York state to New England. A general 6-12 inches of snow is forecast to fall in this swath, with locally higher amounts.

The swath from Boston, northward to Portland, Maine, westward to Concord, New Hampshire; Worcester, Massachusetts; Rutland, Vermont, and Albany, New York, will likely be within the zone that receives the greatest amount of snow from the early week storm and cumulative amount of snow forward from Saturday.

Significant snow will fall on the zone from Providence, Rhode Island, to Hartford, Connecticut, and Poughkeepsie, New York.

Crews and property owners already struggling with up to several feet of snow on the ground and on some roofs will need to prepare and make room for additional snow.

Up to a few inches of snow can reach as far south as northern Pennsylvania, northern New Jersey, the lower Hudson Valley of New York and southern Connecticut.

Enough snow, sleet and freezing rain can fall to make roads slippery around New York City, especially where the precipitation occurs during the early morning and evening hours.

People heading home from their weekend trips may encounter delays, including those partaking in the excellent skiing conditions the onslaught of storms has produced.

Airline and ground travel delays due to snow or some sort of wintry mix are likely from Boston, southward to New York City, and westward to Buffalo, Cleveland, Toronto and Detroit on Monday.

The worst travel conditions will be along the New York Thruway and Southern Tier Expressway, the Massachusetts Turnpike, Interstate 84, I-88, I-91, I-93, I-95 from north of New York City to Maine and I-81 in northern Pennsylvania and New York State.

Minor travel delays are likely farther to the south on the fringe of the early week storm from Chicago to Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. A few locations in this swath can pick up a coating to an inch of snow and slush.

The bulk of the snow will exit the Northeast Monday night, but some snow will linger in part of eastern New England and the Appalachians into Tuesday.

Chilly air will expand in the wake of the storm early next week, before a major blast of arctic air sweeps from the Midwest to the East late in the week.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

New: Moral Compass: Great Places to Go Where the Going Does Good

moralcompasstravel.info

Check out our newest travel site for special deals, insiders’ tips at tidbitts.com: http://www.tidbitts.com/karen-rubin/where-in-the-world

 

AccuWeather Warns of Life-Threatening Flooding, Mudslides for Northern California

February 6, 2015
(Accuweather.com)

(Accuweather.com)

AccuWeather is warning of heavy rain that will inundate coastal Oregon and northern California into early next week, threatening serious flash flooding, mudslides and travel delays and cancellations.

A Pineapple Express will help to fuel the heavy rain as the first of two major storms plows into the Pacific coast through Saturday, Meghan Mussoline, Meteorologist, reported.

The heaviest rain from the first storm will soak Northern California through Friday night.

“A Pineapple Express is a continuous surge of tropical moisture extending from near Hawaii all the way into a West Coast storm,” AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Bernie Rayno said.

This pattern can significantly enhance rainfall and threats such as flooding. Recent burn scar areas in California will be especially vulnerable to flooding and debris flows, since rain water cannot penetrate scorched ground.

Widespread rainfall amounts of 2-3 inches are expected in western Oregon and northern California, including in the Bay Area. In far northern California, amounts will exceed 6 inches in some communities through Saturday.

Lengthy flight delays and cancellations are possible at San Francisco International Airport on Friday due to low clouds and excessive rainfall associated with the storm.

Motorists may face travel problems on the ground as rain mixes with oil buildup on roadways to create slick conditions.

During Saturday into Saturday night, the rain will taper to showers. However, runoff will continue to cause small streams to run high.

A second storm will arrive along the West Coast Sunday into Monday, unleashing another round of heavy rain and most likely another dose of flash flooding, mudslides and travel disruptions.

The rounds of rain follow after an extremely dry January for many locations.

“This is the first significant rain [for Northern California] since the middle of December,” Clark said.

January 2015 went down in the record books as the driest January on record for San Francisco with no rain recorded.

Meanwhile, mountain snowpack is an important resource for filling reservoirs and water supply for drought-stricken California. It is crucial to look at snowpack when analyzing the potential impact of storms on the ongoing drought. However, mountain snow is not likely with the upcoming storms, Clark said.

“Snow levels, because of the warm subtropical flow, will be very high, above 8,000 feet most of the time,” Clark said. “Therefore, while the rains are welcomed, though too much in some places is not good either, these storms will be no help in putting down a snowpack.”

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com for updates on the Pineapple Express

AccuWeather: MinuteCast Survey Shows How Weather Affects Behavior; Launches Sweepstakes

December 10, 2014
AccuWeather's Christmas forecast. Get minute-by-minute weather through its mobile app, MinuteCast.

AccuWeather’s offers probabilities of a White Christmas. Get minute-by-minute weather through its mobile app, MinuteCast.

AccuWeather, a leader in weather information and digital media, announced the results of a national survey that details how winter weather conditions affect consumer behavior by the minute, from road travel to holiday preparations.  The AccuWeather MinuteCast® study polled 1,000 respondents across the U.S., revealing findings with some stark regional differences.

MinuteCast enables drivers to check snow and rain conditions at their exact locations as well as their destinations, minute-by-minute allowing them to plan the best times for road travel and holiday shopping and make the most of every minute during the busy holiday season.

Winter weather means more car time for Americans. The survey found that when winter weather hits, 87 percent of respondents give themselves up to 30 extra minutes when heading out on the road.  Regionally, Midwesterners give themselves the most time to account for winter conditions during their daily drive, with 52 percent allotting an extra 16-30 minutes.

As minutes count down to holiday celebrations, weather also has a direct impact on retail shopping.  The survey found that 58 percent of adults would not head out for holiday shopping in the event of a forecast of at least 4 inches of snow.  Southerners are more likely to delay shopping in inclement winter conditions, with 35 percent stating that just 1-3 inches of snow would hold them back from retail brick-and-mortar stores.  In contrast, in the Northeast, 33 percent of respondents stated that it would take a more significant snowfall amount of 7-9 inches to keep them from braving the elements.. The survey also found that the majority of respondents did not have to brave bad winter weather to complete their last-minute holiday list last year.

To see how winter weather will impact last-minute shopping this season, go to AccuWeather.com or use the AccuWeather mobile app available on most popular digital devices for weather forecasts with Superior Accuracy™, featuring AccuWeather MinuteCast – the unique, patent-based, minute-by-minute precipitation forecast for users’ exact street addresses or GPS locations.  It gives users by-the-minute precipitation forecasts for the next two hours, including precipitation type and intensity, start times, and end times for their exact locations. AccuWeather MinuteCast is uniquely supported by both national and international patented technology.

AccuWeather MinuteCast Moments Sweepstakes

AccuWeather is also inviting people to share how they are using MinuteCast to make every minute count through the AccuWeather MinuteCast Moments Sweepstakes.  To share a MinuteCast Moments picture and caption and enter for a chance to win, visit AccuWeather’s Facebook page at www.Facebook.com/AccuWeather .  Participants can also enter via Twitter or Instagram and must include the hashtag #MinuteCast with their entries.  The sweepstakes began at 12:00 am ET on November 17, 2014 and ends at 11:59 pm ET on January 11, 2015 at 11:59 pm ET. Open to legal residents of the 50 United States, Washington D.C., and Canada (excluding Quebec) who are 18 years of age or older. Limit one entry per person per week. No purchase necessary. Winners will be selected at random after the sweepstakes ends. For complete sweepstakes rules, visit www.Facebook.com/AccuWeather.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

New: Moral Compass: Great Places to Go Where the Going Does Good

moralcompasstravel.info

Check out our newest travel site for special deals, insiders’ tips at tidbitts.com: http://www.tidbitts.com/karen-rubin/where-in-the-world

AccuWeather Winter Forecast: Cold, Snow to Seize Northeast; Wintry Blasts to Slick South

October 22, 2014
AccuWeather's winter prediction: cold, snow to seize the Northeast; wintry blasts to slick South (map from AccuWeather)

AccuWeather’s winter prediction: cold, snow to seize the Northeast; wintry blasts to slick South (map from AccuWeather)

AccuWeather is forecasting that  though parts of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic had a gradual introduction to fall, winter will arrive without delay. Cold air and high snow amounts will define the season – good for ski resorts but not so good for urban areas and Mid-Atlantic places where even the slightest amount of snow or ice wreaks havoc.

Farther south, ice storms and snow events will threaten the Tennessee Valley and parts of the southern Plains. Much of the South can prepare for a wet winter, with some severe weather encroaching on Florida.

The northern Plains will be somewhat inconsistent with variable, back-and-forth temperatures and below-normal snowfall. Meanwhile, the drought will persist in the Northwest and northern California and ease slightly farther south.

Cold Northeast, Interior Mid-Atlantic to Yield Snowy Winter Season

After record-shattering temperatures and high snow totals last winter in the Northeast, a similar theme will continue into the 2014-2015 season.

Cold air will surge into the Northeast in late November, but the brunt of the season will hold off until January and February. The polar vortex, the culprit responsible for several days of below-zero temperatures last year, will slip down into the region from time to time, delivering blasts of arctic air.

“I think, primarily, we’ll see that happening in mid-January into February but again, it’s not going to be the same type of situation as we saw last year, not as persistent,” AccuWeather.com Expert Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said.

“The cold of last season was extreme because it was so persistent. We saw readings that we haven’t seen in a long time: 15- to 20-below-zero readings.”

In addition to the cold air, a big snow season could be in the offing. Higher-than-normal snow totals are forecast west of the I-95 corridor.

“Places like Harrisburg, down to Hagerstown getting into the mountains, the Appalachians, I think that’s where you’re going to see your bigger, heavier amounts,” Pastelok said.

Philadelphia, which received a whopping 68.9 inches last season, is forecast to close this season with snow totals just above normal. New York City will likely follow suit.

The I-95 corridor and eastward could fall victim to changeover systems, which will provide a messy wintry mix at times.

Rain, Snow, Ice All Threats for Southeast, Gulf States, Tennessee Valley

“I’m very concerned about the Tennessee Valley to the Gulf Coast as far as extremes go this year,” Pastelok said.

Areas from eastern Texas all the way up to eastern Kentucky could be under the gun for ice events this season. The region will likely see this in January, but the I-10 corridor should be on guard for a sneaky late-January or early-February storm.

Overall, the region will have a very wet winter, but the timing of these storms will determine whether a flood risk exists.

“These are big storms that are going to form and put down a lot of rain, but there may be breaks in between,” Pastelok said.

“The Gulf hasn’t been disturbed from tropical activity, so the warmer waters may hang on into the middle part of the winter and give us that extra boost into some of these systems coming up the East Coast.”

The weather pattern, a weak El Nino, paired with the southern storm track and rich moisture source will set up Florida for a significant severe weather potential in mid- to late winter. Tornadoes will be possible from mid-January to February.

Dry, Less Harsh Winter in Store for Midwest, Ohio Valley, Northern and Central Plains

In a story similar to the Northeast, the winter season has several cold months planned for the Midwest, though not quite as extreme as last year.

Temperature wise, areas such as Duluth, Minnesota, and Green Bay, Wisconsin, may be 7-9 degrees warmer than last year’s three-month average.

Below-normal snowfall totals are also forecast.

Chicago could fail to reach 30 inches this year, and Minneapolis has an even greater chance of falling below normal.

Farther west, the northern and central Plains will endure roller-coaster temperatures. Fewer clipper systems than normal will reach down into the area, preventing high overall snow totals.

El Nino May Lead to High Moisture in Southern Plains, Interior Southwest

A weak El Nino pattern, which is expected to unfold, may lead to high moisture in the Southwest.

“That moisture source is needed to get above-normal snowfall for the region. I do believe there are going to be periods where moisture gets in there,” Pastelok said.

If it does, the Four Corners region, including Albuquerque, could get near- to slightly above-normal snowfall totals this year.

“Northwestern Texas, western Oklahoma, Kansas, they can also see near- to slightly above-normal snowfall this year,” Pastelok said.

Winter Precipitation Won’t Bust Northwest, Northern California Drought

As California suffers through its fourth and most extreme year of drought, the state is in dire need of precipitation this winter.

“California, the northern Sierra and Sierra Nevada are going to be below normal, although I do think that they are going to get enough snow to hold back the drought just a little bit from getting any worse than it is,” Pastelok said.

December will bring some rain to northern California, but the precipitation will ease off in the following months, making the region drier than normal by February. After a season of intense wildfires, the precipitation that reaches the Northwest will not be enough to prevent problems next year.

However, the winter isn’t all bad news for the drought-stricken region, Pastelok said.

The weather pattern will allow some Eastern Pacific moisture to be pulled in, causing some big events which will increase the snowfall rates in the mountains.

Additionally, Southern California looks to fare better than its northern counterpart with slightly above-normal precipitation this season, especially in areas farther from the coast.

 

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress.com

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

New: Moral Compass: Great Places to Go Where the Going Does Good

moralcompasstravel.info

Check out our newest travel site for special deals, insiders’ tips at tidbitts.com: http://www.tidbitts.com/karen-rubin/where-in-the-world

Arthur to Crash Atlantic Coast July Fourth Beach Vacations

July 3, 2014

In a case of rotten timing, AccuWeather.com is reporting thatHurricane Arthur will bring dangerous surf and a period of wet weather to many Atlantic coast beaches during the Fourth of July. In much of the Northeast, the surf will remain rough on Saturday.

Millions of people from Daytona Beach, Florida, to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Virginia Beach, Virginia; Wildwood, New Jersey; the Hamptons, New York; and Cape Cod, Massachusetts, will be impacted on their vacation during part of this week.

Even though the track of Arthur will take the center east of most beaches Thursday, Friday and Saturday, winds offshore will create large swells which will propagate onshore in the form of powerful waves as well as frequent, strong rip currents, Alex Sosnowski, Expert Senior Meteorologist reported for AccuWeather.com.

People are urged to obey restrictions on the beach and in the surf this weekend. Failure to do so may put not only themselves at risk but also their would-be rescuers.

“A storm is tremendous in what it can do to the shore and how dangerous it can become to swimmers,” American Lifeguard Association National Spokesperson Wyatt Werneth said. “Rip currents are strongest when the tide is coming in and the wind is onshore.”

The surf will continue to build through Friday along much of the East coast as Arthur strengthens and spins northward.

Surf conditions and seas will remain rough Saturday from the Delmarva Peninsula to New Jersey, Long Island and Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

With the approach and passage of Arthur, pleasure boaters should check for the latest advisories and warnings. People should consider keeping their craft in port or remaining within the protection of the Intracoastal Waterway. The latest information on Arthur, including watches, warnings and advisories can be found on the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center.

Gusty squalls will reach the coastal areas from the upper South Carolina coast and will spread northward over eastern North Carolina into Thursday night. Typical summertime drenching storms are possible through Friday over Florida.

The worst weather and the greatest risk of heavy rain and gusty winds in eastern North Carolina, southeastern Virginia, the Delmarva Peninsula and New Jersey will be late Thursday into Friday morning.

In the coastal areas of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, there is the risk of flooded roadways, damaging gusts and blinding downpours in squalls. The power could go out in some communities.

The combination of storm surge and tides will produce a coastal inundation of 1-3 feet with localized inundation of 4 feet from North Carolina to southeastern Virginia. Arthur may have enough impact on parts of this area for officials to prompt mandatory evacuations. Hyde County, North Carolina, officials have issued a mandatory evacuation for Hatteras Island.

Farther north from Long Island to the southern New England beaches, drenching downpours and gusty winds are forecast Thursday night into Friday night. There is a risk of flash flooding in this area with minor coastal flooding possible on portions of Long Island and Cape Cod.

The worst weather will end prior to the surf subsiding, so many will still be able to enjoy their stay at the beach safely, as long as they observe surf restrictions set forth by authorities.

Sunshine will return to South Carolina on Friday morning, and clearing will expand northeastward to eastern North Carolina, southeastern Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula Friday afternoon and evening.

During Saturday and Sunday, the sun will be shining on most areas from the Carolinas to southeastern New England with a dramatic drop in humidity.

After tropical moisture and a front bring the risk of flooding downpours and gusty thunderstorms into part of the Fourth of July, clearing is forecast in time for fireworks from Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia, and New York City. However, the prospect of rain has pushed the Boston show forward to Thursday night. However, thunderstorms are possible Thursday night in eastern New England.

There is a risk of typical spotty thunderstorms lingering into the evening around Florida for fireworks locations such as Walt Disney World, Accuweather’s Sosnowski reported.

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

Winter Storms Likely to Delay Christmas Travel for More than Half the US, Accuweather Forecasts

December 19, 2013

accuweather-xmas 121813

AccuWeather.com is forecasting that winter storms are likely to delay Christmas travel for more than half the US.

Multiple storms will produce areas of rain, ice and snow with areas of dense fog which can cause trouble for travelers over the Central, Eastern and Northwestern states over the next several days, according to Alex Sosnowski, Expert Senior Meteorologist  for AccuWeather.com.

The largest storm of the bunch will hit this weekend and will affect nearly 30 states and over 100 million people.

The atmosphere will quickly change gears the next few days to a pattern that will briefly send warmer air into the eastern third of the nation. Temperatures may challenge with record highs.

The warmth will mean no snow or ice problems for millions of people in the South, Ohio Valley, mid-Atlantic and southeastern New England. However, that warmth will also be accompanied by episodes of rain and fog that can still lead to travel delays.

According to Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams, “Conditions will be favorable for extensive fog to form with the warmup, even in the absence of heavy rain.”

The fog could settle over long stretches of highways and delay flights for hours at some major airports.

On Friday, one storm will spread some rain and drizzle from the Ohio Valley to the central Appalachians and southern New England. Because of a cold ground, fog may form with or without snow cover and affect the cities of the cities of Pittsburgh, New York and Boston.

Farther north, from that same Friday storm, some snow and a wintry mix will reach eastward across from parts of Michigan to upstate New York and northern New England. While snowfall with this system will be considered to be minor, enough can fall to cause slippery roads.

Showers and patchy fog will also reach from the central Gulf Coast to the southern Appalachians with that system Friday and Saturday.

A storm will affect the Northwest Friday into Saturday. Enough cold air will be present with the storm to bring some snow to near sea level in western Washington, including around Seattle, Friday morning. Snow will fall over the passes in the Cascades Friday before a change to rain. Periods of snow and slippery travel is likely Friday and Saturday over portions of the northern Rockies.

Yet another storm is forecast to take shape over the South Central states Saturday and quickly expand northward and eastward Sunday. The storm will become the major weather maker prior to Christmas over the eastern half of the nation. Major travel disruptions are likely from this storm.

The weekend storm will bring rain and not snow to areas from much of Texas to northern Florida to coastal Maine, thanks to a surge of warmer air.

The rain can become heavy enough to cause urban flooding. Cities that have a chance of heavy rain include Dallas, Memphis, Atlanta, Cincinnati and Boston. With the rain will come with the potential for episodes of dense fog and low ceilings, which could add to flight delays and cause cancellations.

A zone of ice and snow is expected to develop on the northwestern fringe of the rain area. Metro areas that could be hit with travel delays include Oklahoma City, Kansas City, Mo., Chicago and Detroit.

The storm will also have major impact on neighboring Canada. There is the risk of heavy ice affecting a large part of southern Ontario, including the greater Toronto area. A heavy wintry mix is possible for Ottawa and Montreal.

There is also a risk of severe thunderstorms in part of the South from the second storm.

AccuWeather.com Severe Weather Expert Henry Margusity said, “We could be looking at a severe weather outbreak including a few tornadoes beginning from central and eastern Texas to the lower Mississippi Valley with this second storm Saturday into Sunday.”

In the wake of the second storm with its rain, fog, ice and snow will follow a push of chilly air that will last into Christmas Day. While this is not likely to be as cold as some prior Arctic outbreaks thus far, it may get cold enough to cause wet areas to freeze.

The weekend storm will bring rain and not snow to areas from much of Texas to northern Florida to coastal Maine, thanks to a surge of warmer air.

The rain can become heavy enough to cause urban flooding. Cities that have a chance of heavy rain include Dallas, Memphis, Atlanta, Cincinnati and Boston. With the rain will come with the potential for episodes of dense fog and low ceilings, which could add to flight delays and cause cancellations.

A zone of ice and snow is expected to develop on the northwestern fringe of the rain area. Metro areas that could be hit with travel delays include Oklahoma City, Kansas City, Mo., Chicago and Detroit.

The storm will also have major impact on neighboring Canada. There is the risk of heavy ice affecting a large part of southern Ontario, including the greater Toronto area. A heavy wintry mix is possible for Ottawa and Montreal.

There is also a risk of severe thunderstorms in part of the South from the second storm.

AccuWeather.com Severe Weather Expert Henry Margusity  said, “We could be looking at a severe weather outbreak including a few tornadoes beginning from central and eastern Texas to the lower Mississippi Valley with this second storm Saturday into Sunday.”

In the wake of the second storm with its rain, fog, ice and snow will follow a push of chilly air that will last into Christmas Day. While this is not likely to be as cold as some prior Arctic outbreaks thus far, it may get cold enough to cause wet areas to freeze.

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures

AccuWeather: Prime Viewing Conditions in Northeast for Leonid Meteor Shower, Comet ISON

November 15, 2013

accuweather-meteor 111513The best locations for viewing the Leonid Meteor Shower in the United States will be in the Northeast and across the Southwest, Nov. 16-18.

AccuWeather.com’s Jillian MacMath reports the Leonid meteor shower, which began in early November, will peak Nov. 16-18, 2013, though it may be tough to see due to another celestial display.

As the shower hits its peak this weekend, the moon will near its full phase, making the sky particularly bright.

“This will be a major obstacle to viewing this sometimes brilliant meteor shower,” AccuWeather.com Astronomy Expert Mark Paquette said.

Despite the moonlight, the meteors will pick up steam after midnight and display the greatest numbers just before dawn on the 17th and 18th.

The best locations for viewing the show in the United States will be in the Northeast and across the Southwest.

Likewise, comet ISON will be more visible than usual this weekend, especially on Nov. 17.

This comet is new to our solar system and has undergone significant brightening in the last few days making it visible to the naked eye, MacMath reports.

However, despite its visibility now, it will near the sun next and it could be destroyed, according to Paquette. If the comet survives, it could again be visible as it moves away from the sun in the weeks after Thanksgiving.

Due its potential destruction, the ideal time to view this comet is this weekend.

It can be seen near the constellation Virgo just before dawn on Nov. 17. The brighter conditions of the comet will not yet make it visible to the naked eye, but it can be seen with a telescope or binoculars.

On November 17 and 18, it will pass by the star Spica, improving its viewing conditions for areas with clear skies.

For more travel features, visit:

www.examiner.com/eclectic-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

www.examiner.com/international-travel-in-national/karen-rubin

travelwritersmagazine.com/TravelFeaturesSyndicate

‘Like’ us on facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Twitter: @TravelFeatures