Archive for the ‘New England travel’ Category

Newport Mansions Host Christmas Festivities at Breakers, Elms, Marble House

November 19, 2013
Alva Vanderbilt's grand Marble House, one of the Newport Mansions, is inviting guests for Christmas © 2013 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

Alva Vanderbilt’s grand Marble House, one of the Newport Mansions, is inviting guests for Christmas © 2013 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com

The famed Newport, Rhode Island, Gilded Age mansions, The Breakers, The Elms and Marble House, welcome visitors for Christmas from November 23 through January 1, 2014. The Preservation Society of Newport County is presenting music, tours, shopping events, and visits from Santa Claus at three of America’s grandest historic houses.

New this year is a gingerbread house competition at The Breakers.  Four local pastry programs have created gingerbread models of the Newport Mansions that are on display in the kitchen.  The competitors are Clements’ Marketplace in Portsmouth, RI; Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School of Fall River, MA;  Fatulli’s Gourmet Bakery in  Middletown, RI; and Russell Morin Fine Catering of Newport and Providence, RI.

Returning to the Great Hall of The Breakers this year is the 15-foot tall poinsettia tree, which for the past few years had been displayed at The Elms.   The “tree” is made up of 150 individual poinsettia plants, grown in the Preservation Society’s own greenhouses.  The plants are removed and replaced several times during the six-week holiday season to ensure the display remains fresh.

Christmas trees of various sizes throughout the houses are adorned with new flickering LED candle lights. Additional decorations in the three houses include dozens of wreaths, hundreds of yards of garland and thousands of flowers, including poinsettia plants, lilies, roses, carnations and potted palms.  Ornaments reflect the colors and décor of individual rooms, and white candles illuminate the windows.  Additional highlights include an eight-foot decorated wreath on the grand staircase of Marble House, new large evergreen kissing balls hung in each house, and a pastel floral theme in the ballroom of The Elms.

Three Houses Open Daily

Christmas officially arrives at the Newport Mansions on Saturday, November 23.  The Breakers, The Elms and Marble House will be fully decorated and open daily for tours, except Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, through January 1, 2014.  A Winter Passport ticket providing daytime admission to all three houses can be purchased for $28 for adults, $9 for children 6-17. Children under the age of 6 are admitted free.  Individual house tickets are also available. Tickets can be purchased online at www.NewportMansions.org, or at each property.

Holiday Evenings at the Newport Mansions

Holiday Evenings at the Newport Mansions provide a unique opportunity to see these historic houses lit up for a night-time celebration. Guests can take a leisurely self-guided tour through the museum, enjoying live holiday music and a stop for cookies and pastries, eggnog and cider.  Holiday Evenings at The Breakers are scheduled for November 30 and December 7, 14, and 28, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. On December 21, guests can enjoy a Holiday Evening Duet: The Elms and Marble House, and see both of the houses for the price of one, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Admission to Holiday Evenings is $28 in advance, $35 at the door.  Children 6-17 are admitted for $10. Children under the age of 6 are admitted free.  Preservation Society members enjoy reduced admission, $25 in advance, $30 at the door.  On December 21, a single ticket provides admission to both The Elms and Marble House, as well as shuttle service operating between the two houses.  More information, including the schedule of Holiday Evening entertainment, and advance tickets are available online at www.NewportMansions.org, or call (401) 847-1000.

Visits with Santa Claus 

Children can visit with Santa Claus in a spectacular setting at each of the three mansions on Sundays in December.  Santa will make public appearances from noon to 3 p.m. at The Breakers on December 8, Marble House on December 15, and The Elms on December 22.  The visit with Santa is included in the regular admission price.

About The Mansions

The Breakers, a 70-room Italian Renaissance-style palazzo, was designed by architect Richard Morris Hunt and completed in 1895 for Cornelius Vanderbilt II, President and Chairman of the New York Central Railroad.  Its interiors include rich marbles and gilded rooms, a 50-foot high Great Hall, mosaic tile floors and ceilings, and open-air terraces with magnificent ocean views.

The Elms is an elegant French-style chateau built in 1901 for Philadelphia coal magnate Edward J. Berwind.  It serves as a backdrop for monumental artworks, including wall-sized 18th century Venetian paintings and Chinese lacquer panels.  The Elms is situated on a 10-acre park with an elaborate sunken garden.

Marble House was the summer home of Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. Built and furnished at a reported cost of $11 million, it was the most lavish house in America when it opened in 1892.  It became a grand stage for Alva Vanderbilt’s climb to social and political power, first as a leading society hostess and later as a leader of the “Votes for Women” campaign.

The Preservation Society of Newport County, Rhode Island is a non-profit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and dedicated to preserving and interpreting the area’s historic architecture, landscapes and decorative arts.  Its 11 historic properties—seven of them National Historic Landmarks—span more than 250 years of American architectural and social development.

For further information, visit www.NewportMansions.org.

New Inn to Inn Bike Tour of New Hampshire’s Lakes Region

August 14, 2013

Biking is one of  the most popular outdoor activities in New Hampshire’s Lakes Region, and for good reason. The area is full of trails with both leisurely and challenging terrain surrounded by beautiful scenery.

Now there is a newly developed program called the Inn-to-Inn Bike Tour.

Several organizations within New Hampshire have partnered up to bring biking visitors a regional tour designed for ultimate sights and relaxation. Travel between seven historical inns in the Lakes and Darmouth/Lake Sunapee Regions and take a cyclist’s dream tour around beautiful New Hampshire.

The Inns include:

  • Follansbee Inn on Kezar Lake in North Sutton
  • Inn on Newfound Lake in Bristol
  • Shaker Farm Bed & Breakfast in Enfield
  • Common Man Inn  & Spa in Plymouth
  • Inn at Pleasant Lake in New London
  • Common Man Inn & Spa in Claremont
  • Highland Lake Inn in Andover

Visit www.bikethenorthernrailtrail.com for information, pricing and reservations.

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Newport’s Preservation Society Costume Exhibit at Rosecliff Traces 20th Century Fashion

June 7, 2013

As the summer playground to many of America’s wealthiest families, Newport was once a swirl of couture dresses in a seemingly endless string of balls and entertainments. The Preservation Society of Newport County’s annual costume exhibition at Rosecliff (1902) this year highlights 20th century fashion and the way designers marketed changing styles and silhouettes to American consumers. The 11 dresses on exhibit are among the finest garments in the Preservation Society’s collection, from designers such as Chanel, Givenchy and Halston, among others.

Among the highlights of the exhibit is a 1925 evening gown by Callot Soeurs of Paris. With its straight profile, this evening dress epitomized the style of the period. The increasing popularity of automobiles and dance crazes such as the jitterbug necessitated shorter hemlines and ushered in a new silhouette for the 1920s. Heavy corsetting and layers of skirts were out, girdles and bras that flattened out the figure were in.

From the late 1930s to the mid ’40s, dresses were back to having a more defined waist and fuller skirt to emphasize the female figure. The exhibit includes a 1941 tea party dress made of cotton organdy which demonstrates this style.

Additional highlights include a 1965 red skirt suit by Chanel, a 1985 cotton organdy pant suit with glass beads by Halston, and a wool cocktail dress by Givenchy from the 1990s.

The Preservation Society’s costume collection helps to trace the changing role of women in American society over the centuries. The creation of one-of-a-kind garments, known as haute couture, has represented the pinnacle of high fashion since the 19th century. The allure of haute couture still captivates the imagination today; however, due to dwindling markets, collections now include fewer pieces than they did in the early 20th century.

Beginning in the 1960s, designers licensed their names for use on products and expanded their own lines beyond apparel. At the same time, the retail clothing industry diversified, providing more options at different price points. Today, haute couture collections no longer set the standards for how women should dress. Instead, they have evolved into marketing tools that shape a designer’s “brand” and increase sales of affordable products. Some devotees still buy haute couture clothing, but it is a shrinking population.

The exhibit is on display in the Lesley Bogert Crawford costume galleries on the 2nd floor of Rosecliff through November 22. Admission to the exhibit is included with any Rosecliff tour ticket, including multi-house tickets. Rosecliff is open daily for tours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through November 22, except when it is closed for the Newport Flower Show June 20-23. Newport Mansions tickets can be purchased online at www.NewportMansions.org, or in person at any Preservation Society property.

The Preservation Society of Newport County, Rhode Island is a non-profit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and dedicated to preserving and interpreting the area’s historic architecture, landscapes and decorative arts. Its 11 historic properties—seven of them National Historic Landmarks—span more than 250 years of American architectural and social development.

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‘America in View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now’ Exhibit at Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design

August 21, 2012

Laura McPhee’s Smoke from a Wildfire Ignited by Sparks from a Burn Barrel, Champion Creek, Custer County, Idaho, 2005. Gift of the artist and Carroll and Sons (Boston, MA) in honorof Joe Deal, is part of the America in View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now exhibit on view at Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design,  Providence. © Laura McPhee. Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design, Providence.

The Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design announces its major fall exhibition, America in View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now, a broad panorama of our country’s topographies and correlating narratives that reveals a nation’s ambitions and failings, beauty and loss, politics and personal stories through about 150 photographs spanning nearly 150 years. The show opens Friday, September 21, 2012, and is on view through January 13, 2013.

The public is invited to a free opening party at the RISD Museum on Thursday, September 20, at 5:30 pm; all are welcome.

On Wednesday, October 3, at 6:15 pm, Sally Mann, one of the most influential photographers in the world today, shares her evocative images and reads from her forthcoming book.

“The landscape has inspired and challenged artists since the earliest days of our nation,” says Museum Director John W. Smith. “The remarkable works in this exhibition not only capture photography’s evolving relationship with the landscape but also trace the larger narrative of America itself.”

From the earliest images in the show, it is clear how purpose guided style. Carlton Watkins’ 1860s painterly and atmospheric views of the sublime landscape portray the wilderness as a place of spiritual renewal and a refuge from urban problems. In contrast, Timothy O’Sullivan, employed for the government’s geological surveys in the 1870s, made purposefully spare and anti-picturesque images that seem to provide proof of empty territories needing to be studied, secured, and settled.

In her essay for America in View‘s accompanying catalogue, photographer Deborah Bright, chair of the Fine Art Department at Pratt Institute, suggests that some of the historical shifts in environmental consciousness seen in the photographs “illuminate how the works also reflect changing conceptions of landscapes as bearers of cultural meaning.” Ansel Adams, whose mid-20th-century views of nature’s majesty and vastness represent many people’s ideals of American landscape photography, omitted human impact on the land. Widely used by the Sierra Club, his stunning images of untouched wilderness encouraged conservation in the face of an increasingly industrial society.

By the 1970s, artists including the late RISD provost and photography professor Joe Deal saw that the environment entailed both wilderness and the vacant lot next door. Their “New Topographics” imagery depicts recently constructed tract homes, industrial parks, and highway culture —- inverting Adams’ exclusion. “‘Landscape’ is probably better understood as that set of expectations and beliefs… we project upon the world,” explains Brown University art historian Douglas Nickel in the catalogue. “Not every photograph of land is a landscape, and not every landscape necessarily features the land.”

The past 20 years reveal a return to romantic views of the landscape, even in its degraded state, often including figures to create narratives. Justine Kurland’s landscape under an overpass shows a stunning place of fantasy and escape. RISD alumnus Justin Kimball explores fantasies of finding wilderness in public parks —- where instead we find others seeking the same.

America in View was inspired by a generous gift of photographs from Deal and his widow, Betsy Ruppa. Jan Howard, the Museum’s curator of Prints, Drawings + Photographs, says, “This gift, and other contributions in Joe’s honor, gives the Museum a new strength in late 20th-century landscape photography, celebrated in this exhibition.”

Southeastern New England’s only comprehensive art museum, the Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design —- also known as the RISD Museum of Art —- was established in 1877. Its permanent collection of more than 86,000 objects includes paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, costume, furniture, and other works of art from every part of the world —- including objects from ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, and art of all periods from Asia, Europe, and the Americas, up to the latest in contemporary art. The Museum also offers a wide array of educational and public programs to more than 100,000 visitors annually.

The RISD Museum of Art, with entrances at 224 Benefit Street and 20 North Main Street in Providence, RI, is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 am-5 pm, and 10 am-9 pm on Thursday. For more information, call 401 454-6500 or visit risdmuseum.org.

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Historic Woodstock Inn & Resort Offers Special $195 Rate through Sept 13

August 21, 2012

No need to pack away the summer whites just yet. With record breaking above-average temperatures this summer expected to continue past Labor Day, the Woodstock Inn & Resort invites travelers to extend their summer with a special per night rate of $195 through September 13.

“Visitors are welcome to enjoy the ‘Endless Summer’ feel at the Woodstock Inn & Resort before the crisp cool air of fall settles into the region,” said President and General Manager Werner Graef. “The weather is ideal for experiencing the great outdoors including our award winning golf course.”

The “Endless Summer” rate represents a savings of 30 percent and is available Sunday through Thursday from August 20 to September 13, 2012, based on double occupancy. Rate excludes applicable taxes and resort fee.

Golfers looking for an endless summer getaway can tee-off at the Robert Trent Jones, Sr 18-hole golf course with the Unlimited Golf Package starting at $349 per room, per night. The packageincludes:

Unlimited golf at The Resort’s Golf Club

One night luxury accommodation

Golf cart

Continental breakfast for two

Complimentary use of the practice facility

The Unlimited Golf package is valid now through October 31, 2012, based on double occupancy, excluding applicable taxes and resort fee.

The culturally rich destination of Woodstock has an abundance of antique shops, art galleries, boutiques, restaurants, specialty food markets and more, all within steps of the resort. Guests can walk Main Street and partake in nearby outdoor activities including hiking, biking, and tennis.

Relaxation and recreation are essential components of a stay at The Woodstock Inn & Resort. The property’s 10,000 square-foot LEED-certified spa offers a nature-inspired ambiance and features nourishing treatments with organic products. The Racquet & Fitness Club is a comprehensive facility with indoor and outdoor tennis courts, racquetball courts, a 30-by-60 foot indoor lap pool, a whirlpool, workout equipment and a steam room and sauna. Dining options include The Red Rooster, the resort’s award-winning fine dining restaurant emphasizing fresh, local ingredients sourced from the best purveyors in New England. And, Richardson’s Tavern offers a cozy old-world atmosphere with an extensive dinner menu and full bar.

For more information, become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Woodstock-Inn-Resort, visit www.woodstockinn.com or call (888)-481-8802.

A Weekend of Coaching Returns to Newport, August 16-19

August 8, 2012


Authentic 19th century coaches drawn by matched and highly-trained teams of horses will return to Newport from August 16-19, 2012, in the triennial renewal of a Weekend of Coaching, hosted by The Preservation Society of Newport County. A gala dinner-dance in honor of the whips will be held at The Breakers © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

Authentic 19th century coaches drawn by matched and highly-trained teams of horses will return to Newport from August 16-19, 2012, in the triennial renewal of a Weekend of Coaching, hosted by The Preservation Society of Newport County. The public will enjoy free viewing of the colorful and historic coaches every day, as they drive through the streets of Newport and the grounds of the Newport Mansions, celebrating and preserving a century-old sporting tradition.

“This is one of our favorite events because it is so unique and so much fun,” said Preservation Society CEO & Executive Director Trudy Coxe.” “We are very grateful to the members of the Coaching Club for staging this event in Newport again, and for making the Preservation Society the beneficiary of their fundraising efforts.”

The drivers, or “whips” as they are referred to in the sport of coaching, who are expected to attend are: Mr. S. Tucker Johnson, of Hobe Sound, Florida, President of the Coaching Club; Dr. Timothy J. Butterfield, of Derry, New Hampshire; Frederick E. Eayrs, of Middleboro, Massachusetts; Walter F. Eayrs, of Bristol, Rhode Island; Howard Fafard, of Framingham, Massachusetts; John Frazier Hunt, of Spring City, Pennsylvania; Herbert Kohler, of Kohler, Wisconsin; James Mather Miller, of Lakewood Ranch, Florida; Sir Paul & Lady Sarah Nicholson, of Durham, United Kingdom; Louis G. Piancone, of Gladstone, New Jersey; Claire Reid, of Southern Pines, North Carolina; Sir John Richards, of Cheshire, United Kingdom; Harvey W. Waller, of Stockbridge, Massachusetts; George A. Weymouth, of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania; and John White, of Newton, New Jersey.

The routes of the daily drives will be published in the local press and the Preservation Society’s website (www.NewportMansions.org), along with suggested viewing spots. In addition, there will be a free-to-the-public driving exhibition on the grounds of The Elms starting at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday morning, August 18. The weekend will culminate with a formal Coaching Dinner Dance at The Breakers on Saturday evening.

The Honorary Chairs of A Weekend of Coaching are Mr. & Mrs. A. L. Ballard. David E.P. Lindh is the Chair, and Kenneth M.P. Lindh the Vice-Chair of the Weekend. Frederick E. Eayrs is Vice-Chair of Coaching.

The Chairs of the Coaching Dinner Dance are Mrs. Mark (Leslie) Hull; Mrs. David E.P. (Lynda) Lindh; Mrs. Kenneth M.P. (Elaine) Lindh; Mrs. David J. (Beverly) Little; Gladys V. Szápáry; and Mrs. Guy F.C. (Mary) Van Pelt.

Tickets for the dinner-dance in honor of the whips at The Breakers are $450 per person, and reservations are required. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.NewportMansions.org, email Events@NewportMansions.org, or call (401) 847-1000 ext. 140.

The tradition of coaching grew out of the 18th and 19th century mail runs in England, which later made their way across the Atlantic to the United States. The horse-drawn mail coaches were eventually replaced by railroads, but nostalgia led to the development of coaching as a sport. The Coaching Club of New York was formed in the latter part of the 19th century, eventually becoming part of the social fabric of Newport in the summer. The Wetmores, the Bells, the Vanderbilts and the Belmonts were all active members, bringing their coaches together to go to the races, the polo games, and the Casino.

The two types of open-air vehicles used in the sport of coaching—a Road Coach and the slightly smaller Park Drag—employ a team of four horses. All seating is outside, with the driver, known as a “whip,” sitting in the slightly elevated right front seat, and the whip’s wife or female relative taking up the “box seat” on the left. The rear bench of the coach holds at least two specialized footmen called grooms. Two center benches can hold up to 10 passengers.

The Preservation Society of Newport County, Rhode Island is a non-profit educational organization accredited by the American Association of Museums and dedicated to preserving and interpreting the area’s historic architecture, landscapes and decorative arts. Its 11 historic properties—seven of them National Historic Landmarks—span more than 250 years of American architectural and social development.

For more information, call 401-847-1000 or visit www.NewportMansions.org.

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Nantucket Island Resorts offers ‘Hot Dates, Cool Rates’ summer specials

June 4, 2012

The Inn at the White Elephant Village will open this summer with 20 units, including 14 suites and six deluxe guest rooms. Located on South Beach Street, the new Inn and existing White Elephant Residences will comprise the newly-created White Elephant Village, a natural extension of the award-winning White Elephant hotel that continues to be rated among the top hotels in the world by Travel + Leisure and Condé Nast Traveler magazines.

This hot and humid summer weather has everyone longing for a cool island escape! Nantucket Island Resorts is offering fantastic rates this summer with their Hot Dates, Cool Rates promotion. Think sun-filled days at the beach and evening clambakes on the dock.

The Hot Dates, Cool Rates offer for summer 2012:

  •  Jared Coffin House from $195 | Relax at this historic inn just steps away from Nantucket’s Main Street
  •  The Cottages & Lofts at the Boat Basin from $255 | Admire stunning views of the harbor and spend time with man’s best friend at the WOOF Cottages, the Cottages’ pet-friendly accommodations.
  •  White Elephant from $295 | Sip on delicious cocktails on the lawn overlooking the harbor, stroll the cobblestone streets and shop downtown.
  •  The Wauwinet from $225 | Retreat from the bustle of the town and take a trip to Great Point Lighthouse (located at the very tip of the island with no other soul in sight).
  •  White Elephant Hotel Residences from $350 | Enjoy all of the complimentary extras that the Residences offer, including access to the hotel’s private swimming pool (in season) and complimentary bicycles.

To book online, visit the website of the Nantucket Island Resorts property of your choice and enter the booking code HOV, or call 800.ISLANDS (800.475.2637) or 508.325.1000 and mention booking code HOV.

The Inn at the White Elephant Village will open this summer with 20 units, including 14 suites and six deluxe guest rooms. Located on South Beach Street, the new Inn and existing White Elephant Residences will comprise the newly-created White Elephant Village, a natural extension of the award-winning White Elephant hotel that continues to be rated among the top hotels in the world by Travel + Leisure and Condé Nast Traveler magazines.

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4th Annual Salem Main Streets Salem Arts Festival to be Held June 1-3

May 9, 2012

A painting depicting early Salem, in the Essex Peabody Museum. The 4th annual Salem Main Streets Salem Arts Festival will be held June 1 – 3 © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

The 4th annual Salem Main Streets Salem Arts Festival will be held June 1st – 3rd. The popular and ever- growing event will feature over 80 artists including local bands, painters, photographers, poets, belly dancers, to name a few. The Festival is a family friendly event with free performances, free art making activities and a fantastic range of art on display.

“People love the Salem Arts Festival because it makes art accessible. The festival is completely free from the incredible dance and music to the Juried Art Show in Old Town Hall. We include work ranging from renowned professionals to a 3rd grade boy.” says Jennifer Bell, Manager of Salem Main Streets (SMS), a community non-profit organization which started the Festival. “This year for the first time art patrons will have an opportunity to buy art from the Juried Art Show as well as from a Juried Street Fair,” Bell adds.

Run by a team of volunteers, including representatives from Salem State University, the Peabody Essex Museum and the Salem Arts Association, the Salem Arts Festival is a free event for residents and visitors. The goal of the festival is to promote all the arts in Salem and to provide the entire North Shore arts community an opportunity to showcase their talents.

The Festival is spread out at a variety of venues in downtown Salem, anchored at the Essex Street Walking Mall. A Juried Art Show will be held in Old Town Hall. This year live performances and demonstrations will be held outside, at the Museum Place Mall Fountain (weather permitting). Last year Festival attendance numbers were over 4,000 people and we expect an even larger crowd this year. Rain location for the performances is upstairs Old Town Hall.

The festival kicks off with an opening reception in Old Town Hall Friday, June 1 at 5 p.m. Enjoy beautiful art work and be entertained by Brian Rolland and the Paul Madore Chorale. Saturday and Sunday starting at 11 a.m. there will be live music and dance at the East India Fountain on Essex Street and a Juried Art Show for viewing in Old Town Hall. This year’s festival includes acting improve, a reciting of a chapter from the Odyssey, belly dancing and abstract art making and lots of local favorites playing like Machine 475 and the Heather Maloney Band.

Festival patrons can also enjoy the City of Salem’s Beautification Committee “Lady Of Salem” project, a summer long celebration of Salem’s rich maritime history featuring colorful, creative and whimsical ship figureheads painted by local artist. This exhibit will debut during the Salem Arts Festival and be on display downtown starting June 1. The “Ladies” remain in Port for all to enjoy June-October.

The Salem Arts Festival is offered free to all.

Visitors interested in attending the Salem Arts Festival can find easy access to the downtown by public transportation or parking at one of the many downtown lots in the City. For more information, visit www.salemartsfestival.com.

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Inn at the White Elephant Village to Open in Nantucket Summer 2012

April 3, 2012

The Inn at the White Elephant Village will open summer 2012 with 20 units, including 14 suites and six deluxe guest rooms. Located on South Beach Street, the new Inn and existing White Elephant Residences will comprise the newly-created White Elephant Village, a natural extension of the award-winning White Elephant hotel that continues to be rated among the top hotels in the world by Travel + Leisure and Condé Nast Traveler magazines.

As part of the expansion, the Village will have its own lobby, including reception area, concierge, fireplace, gift shop, and business center. The lobby will serve morning coffee, pastries, all-day snacks, and late-afternoon port and cheese – creating a natural hub for guests. All guests of the White Elephant Village will continue to enjoy exclusive use of the Village’s heated pool and cabanas, fitness center, and complimentary bicycles.

Celebrated Nantucket interior designer Kathleen Hay will bring a warm, neutral palette to the Inn, providing a sophisticated and comfortable décor. Reflecting the ambiance of its island location, the Inn will feature oversized windows, allowing natural sunlight to illuminate the rooms, and quintessential Nantucket wainscoting detail throughout. Each of the suites and deluxe guest rooms will be replete with HD flat-screen TVs and miniature refrigerators as well as linens by Pratesi, plush turkish towels, bathrobes, and cozy slippers. Ideal for families, the 14 suites will offer sofa beds to accommodate couples traveling with children and four of the suites will feature fireplaces.

Managing Director of Nantucket Island Resorts Khaled Hashem sees this expansion as a positive sign that tourism in Nantucket is continuing to grow. “We are excited with the addition of the Inn that will further enable us to host families and groups in the award winning accommodations these travelers expect from the White Elephant.”

The iconic White Elephant hotel and White Elephant Hotel Residences will open for the season on April 19. Guests can book now for suites and guest rooms this summer at the Inn at the White Elephant Village.

For more information visit www.nantucketislandresorts.com or call 800.475.2637.

Nantucket Island Resorts is a collection of premier hotels on Nantucket. Properties include The Wauwinet, ideal for romance with access and views of both bay and ocean beaches and home to the award-winning TOPPER’S restaurant, White Elephant, the iconic hotel located right on Nantucket Harbor that offers a lovely arrangements of rooms, suites, cottages, and a stunning loft as well as the Brant Point Grill, the White Elephant Village offers one-, two-, and three-bedroom Residences and the new Inn, Jared Coffin House, a historic and charming inn located in Nantucket Town, The Cottages & Lofts at the Boat Basin, waterfront cottages with full kitchens located on three wharves jutting out into Nantucket Harbor and featuring 12 pet-friendly accommodations, and Nantucket Boat Basin, a 240 slip full-service award winning marina.

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Spa at Cranwell historic resort in Berkshires celebrates 10 years with 10 specials, giveaway contest

April 1, 2012

Cranwell Resort, Spa and Golf Club, a grand, historic hotel, is celebrating the opening of one of the largest resort spas in the Northeast 10 years ago in 2002. Festivities kick-off with “10 for 10” Specials: one special a month for 10 months © 2012 Karen Rubin/news-photos-features.com.

Cranwell Resort, Spa and Golf Club, a grand, historic hotel, is celebrating the opening of one of the largest resort spas in the Northeast 10 years ago in 2002. Festivities kick-off with “10 for 10” Specials: one special a month for 10 months. In addition, select treatments will be offered on the 10th of each month at 2002 prices ($85 for a Swedish Massage and $95 for a Classic Facial – both for 50-minute services).

Monthly specials will be announced online via a dedicated Spa Anniversary web page www.cranwell.com/spa10 where visitors can also register to win a drawing for the Grand Anniversary Prize, “The Cranwell Spa Day” for 10 Friends. The Spa Day will include a Swedish Massage or Classic Facial, a Spa Pedicure and Spa Café Lunch for each guest. (For further information about the Spa Anniversary specials, visit the website or contact the Spa at Cranwell at 413-881-0721.)

The Spa at Cranwell offers more than 50 services ranging from massages to detoxifying wraps and restorative body treatments. Many of the resort’s guest rooms are linked to The Spa by heated, glass enclosed walkways featuring views of landscaped gardens and wooded grounds. Highlights of the space include 16 treatment rooms, a 60-foot indoor pool with 20-foot glass wall, a state-of-the-art fitness center with daily classes, and a Spa Shop offering a wide assortment of spa essentials.

Cranwell is located in the Berkshire is just two and one-half hours from New York City and Boston in the historic New England village of Lenox, Massachusetts. This award winning resort features 96 distinctive guest rooms and suites, an 18-hole historic golf course set on 380 hilltop acres, and is home to one of the largest resort Spas in the Northeast. With three restaurants and spacious banquet rooms, Cranwell also hosts numerous year-round conferences, weddings and social events.

Cranwell Resort received the Condé Nast Traveler: 2011 Readers’ Choice Award and is listed in Zagat’s “Top U.S. Hotels, Resorts & Spas”. Additional recognitions include SpaFinder Readers’ Choice Award for one of “Best Spa Resorts for Golf” and the Wine Spectator Magazine Award of Excellence.

Cranwell is a partner with Stash Hotel Rewards an innovative hotel rewards program that enables travelers to quickly earn free nights at distinctive, independent hotels without blackouts or expiration date restrictions. The resort is a member of Small Luxury Hotels of the World™ brand and is also a long time member of Historic Hotels of America (www.historichotels.org), which preserves the authenticity of over 200 of America’s most prominent historic hotels and inns.

Cranwell Resort, Spa and Golf Club, 55 Lee Road, Lenox, MA 01240, Toll free: 1-800-272-6935, Phone: 413-637-1364, info@cranwell.com, reservations@cranwell.com, www.cranwell.com.

 See also:

BERKSHIRE’S CULTURE & CRANWELL RESORT’S LUXURY ARE UNBEATABLE COMBO

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